Review excerpt: For more than a decade, Tama has been the place to come for one of Tokyo’s more unusual menus, a unique and stylish hybrid that it calls Ryukyu-Chinese.

Review excerpt: The menu at Yaumay is the same at both lunch and dinner — and it all fits on a single sheet, rather than over several pages, making it much easier to plan out your meal.

Review excerpt: Don’t let the sticky floor deter you because Kyoto's Lucky Gyoza has a great range of delicious dumplings and is worth a visit.

Review excerpt: Taihou feels like a family restaurant. It’s busy, informal and home to some of the best Sichuan cuisine in Kyoto, which explains the line of people, round the clock.

Review excerpt: The main reason why tables at Mimosa are still in such hot demand is because the chef is serving some of the most satisfying Shanghai food in Tokyo.

Review excerpt: While much of the menu at Soryuko is rooted in Sichuan cooking and features big, bold flavors, classics such as Peking duck and shoronpo, the ubiquitous dumpling that originated in Shanghai, are also included.

Review excerpt: The highlights at Matsushima include tofu with Shanghai crab tomalley and enoki mushrooms; hefty cuts of pork smothered in a gleaming sauce of tart black vinegar; and, as the crescendo of the meal, a fiery Sichuan-style oyster hot pot that is wonderfully warming.

Review excerpt: In 2010, Gi changed tactics — slightly — opening Gi Han Ebisu Do on Sanjo shopping street, a short walk west of downtown Kyoto, as well as a sister restaurant in neighboring Osaka. The focus at both of these restaurants is casual ...

Chi-Fu is housed in an ex-noodle factory, an odd modernist-style building a short walk from Kitashinchi Station. The motif for the interior seems to be heavy curtains. Other than that, it’s extremely plain — white walls match the white tablecloths — with none of ...

This cheerful little hole-in-the-wall, which opened last June in the back streets of Shinbashi, serves the cuisine of China’s Inner Mongolia region, the birthplace of both the owner and her chef. As well as stir-fries and plates of boiled meat both on and off ...

Try to find Wai Tan Hong Lu Deng, a small and tatty shop — which gets especially cold on winter nights — that serves Chinese dumplings. The kitchen stands on one side of the narrow thoroughfare, with tables covered in vinyl tablecloths on the ...

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