Review excerpt: Ryo Murata was born into a chef’s family and spent 13 years at one of Tokyo’s most respected unagi restaurants, the venerable Tsukiji Miyagawa Honten. Not only does he have all the skills, he also knows where to source the very tastiest ...

Review excerpt: At Usaya, the eel, sourced from Mikawa in Aichi Prefecture, reigns supreme. For lunch there’s a selection of teishoku (set meals) ranging from ¥1,500 for the unagidon (a bowl of soy-glazed broiled eel on rice).

Review excerpt: Unagi Fujita is a venerable ryōtei (traditional high-class restaurant) based in Hamamatsu, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan’s de facto unagi capital, thanks to the eel farms in nearby Lake Hamanako. The restaurant already has a branch in western Tokyo; now it has arrived in the ...

This old-school unagi (eel) specialist stands in the heart of Ueno Park, just steps from the zoo and the historic Toshogu Shrine, surrounded by a sea of sakura (cherry blossoms). That's the view from the upstairs dining room, if you are lucky (or patient) ...

Whether or not you believe in its restorative powers to combat the debilitating midsummer heat, there's no denying that kabayaki grilled eel is one of Tokyo's great plebeian pleasures. Or that there's any finer setting for indulging than at the wonderful Myojinshita Kandagawa Honten.

Slide open the door and you will be greeted by a matron in kimono, who will direct you to a table in the modest dining room, or, should they all be taken, to a bench in the interior corridor leading back toward the kitchen ...

The most popular dish, as at any unagi restaurant, is unaju — grilled, soy-basted eel laid out on a bed of rice in an ornate lacquer-look box. The soft, melting texture of the fish; the savory tang of the basting sauce; a light dash of ...

Review excerpt: You will not find anywhere in Tokyo that does eel better than Nodaiwa — after all, they’ve been in the business for over 160 years now. Nodaiwa’s handsome premises are worth a visit at any time of year. The core of the restaurant is ...

Not only does Obana specialize in tennen unagi (eels caught from the wild, not reared in fish farms), they are all kept alive until the moment your order comes in. Only then are they nailed down, slit open, skewered, broiled, steamed then broiled again. ...

He keeps a bucket of live eels under his kitchen floorboards. When an order comes in, he fishes one out, fillets and skewers it, then grills it slowly over charcoal. After steaming the fillets for five minutes or so, he dips them into his ...

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