Review excerpt: Before opening Sakurai Japanese Tea Experience, owner Shinya Sakurai worked at the wagashi (traditional Japanese sweets) store Higashiya, an experience that he brings to the bar by pairing brews with sweets. For the summer, Shinya has also borrowed a vintage kakigori (shaved ...

The cake, or sweets to be more precise, on offer are strictly wagashi (traditional Japanese sweets) and the menu is divided between seasonal offerings, such as kashiwa mochi (sweet bean paste enfolded by a gelatinous rice cake and wrapped in an oak leaf), and ...

Thank goodness for Shinya Sakurai. In the year since he opened his elegant boutique-plus-tearoom in the backstreets of Nishi-Azabu, it has become one of the city’s great resources for all things ocha (tea). Its official name is Souen, but it is the English subtitle ...

in 2016, Iori will celebrate its 300th anniversary of making sweets. The menu may be spare, but what’s on offer is wonderful. Whether you are new to wagashi (traditional Japanese confectionery) or have developed a taste for it, I recommend trying the two parfaits, ...

Review excerpt: The instant you see Kuriya Kashi Kurogi you know it’s special. The hidden location, verdant setting and striking architecture are more than remarkable — they are one of a kind. With the Kurogi name, you expect nothing less. Chef Jun Kurogi’s eponymous ryōriya ...

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