Review excerpt: Sashimi, tempura, seafood and wagyu beef: Juban Ukyo's menu covers most of the upmarket favorites.

Review excerpt: For a savory dish at Hood by Vargas, try its New York beef sandwich — it’s small, but packs a lot between the toasted slices of bread.

Review excerpt: Besides the 11 taps of craft beer (plus one of generic Sapporo) and the considerable cellar of artisan nihonshu — 80-plus types, many of them limited edition or otherwise rarely available in the city — this branch of Bakushuan has a very ...

Review excerpt: At Umbilical, look no further than chef Ono’s signature seafood plate. Every day he puts together four choices that can be ordered separately.

Review excerpt: The lunch menu at Kinki Daigaku Suisan Kenkyujo is limited to five set menus. In the evening, there is more choice, but regardless of when you go maguro will be an option, as well as a selection of other fish that Kindai have been ...

Review excerpt: As soon as you sit at Shimme, you’ll be served up a plate of hors d’oeuvre, which changes but is likely to be a small serving of fish, and while they serve much more than seafood, the fish tends to be excellent.

Review excerpt: At Kousai, the restaurant in the town’s smart new visitor center and museum, you can try squid in half a dozen different ways, from soft, smooth sashimi to hot, crispy tempura.

Review excerpt: At Delifucious, there’s the kani-kurīmu korokke burger, a croquette of crab and creamy potato served in a bun with tomato, coleslaw and a honey-mustard sauce. For a deeper, richer flavor, you can order it with kani-miso, the dark, flavorful crab tomalley. This, ...

Review excerpt: Hotaru fits in perfectly but with one key distinction: It is Tokyo's first (and currently only) sake brew-pub. You can see the small steel fermentation tanks gleaming in a glass-enclosed chamber in one corner of the minimally decorated dining room. But don't ...

Review excerpt: The standout dish at Wa Bistro Tsuna was the head and tail of a Pacific sea bream slow-cooked in the holy trinity of Japanese condiments: shoyu, sake and mirin (sweetened rice liquor). Sure, the flesh was scarce at best, but the reward ...

Review excerpt: Occupying the ground floor of its owner’s home, the seating area and kitchen are crammed into a tiny space, and even the handwritten daily menu is crowded onto a small blackboard. When deciding what to try, it’s best to follow the whims, ...

Totoya is simple, unfussy and serves quality food at — thankfully — reasonable prices. A kaisendon (seafood rice bowl) served with soup is only ¥1,000. The space is shared with a fishmonger out front and as an added bonus, on Wednesday and Friday evenings ...

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