author

 
 

Meta

Ruma Paul
For Ruma Paul's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:
Japan Times
ASIA PACIFIC
Jan 25, 2023
Surging crime and bleak future push Rohingya in Bangladesh to risk lives at sea
An increasing number of Rohingya are now leaving Bangladesh for countries such as Malaysia and Indonesia via perilous boat journeys.
Japan Times
ASIA PACIFIC
Dec 27, 2022
Deadly year for Rohingya at sea as 180 presumed drowned
The number of Rohingya leaving Bangladesh in boats this year has jumped more than fivefold from a year earlier to nearly 2,400.
Japan Times
ASIA PACIFIC
Aug 26, 2022
Five years on, Myanmar Rohingya desperate to leave Bangladesh camps and go home
More than a million Rohingya are living in squalid camps in southern Bangladesh comprising the world's largest refugee settlement, with little prospect of returning to Myanmar.
Japan Times
WORLD
Jun 7, 2022
'Sitting above a bomb': Bangladesh's missed fire-safety lessons
Intense scrutiny of the garment industry and the international retailers that rely on it has helped prevent repeated disasters, but this emphasis on safety is lacking in other industries.
Japan Times
ASIA PACIFIC
Apr 24, 2019
Rohingya camps in Bangladesh spawn a new civil society — and political violence
It was after Mohib Ullah scored his first political victories that the death threats began in earnest. On a recent morning, the Rohingya refugee leaned back on a plastic chair in the Bangladesh camp where he lives and translated the latest warning, sent over the WhatsApp messaging app.
Japan Times
ASIA PACIFIC / Crime & Legal
Aug 13, 2018
Arrested and killed: Inside the Bangladesh prime minister's war on drugs
Bangladesh police arrested Riazul Islam as he was walking home from his in-laws' house. At 3:15 a.m., he was shot dead in a sandy field beside a set of railroad tracks north of Dhaka.

Longform

Hideo Shimoju points to a possible site that his fellow neighbors may relocate to. Such relocations have happened before, but not preemptively.
In disaster-prone Japan, some communities consider major moves