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The night the American B-29 warplanes came, Ryohei Nakane had been enriching uranium for Japan’s “super bomb.”

By the next morning — April 13, 1945 — all that remained of his samples and his laboratory at Riken Institute was charred, splintered wood and broken glass.

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