Review excerpt: More than just a grocery store, Akomeya is a treasured source of foodstuffs and cookware from around the country. It also has a superb little restaurant.

Review excerpt: Rakushin — the austere Michelin-starred kaiseki restaurant that opened in 2018 — chef Katayama’s saba-zushi is a perfect balance of salt, vinegar and rice.

Review excerpt: Unlike other fashionable restaurants that focus on the usual Italian-inflected fare, the menu at Lakan-ka is based on light, wholesome Japanese cooking.

Review excerpt: RyuGin 2.0 represents a major upgrade. At last, chef Yamamoto has a setting worthy of his culinary status, and of the well-heeled clientele who will favor this more salubrious and central location.

Review excerpt: Whether you order a la carte or choose one of the set menus at Yuu, you'll be treated to traditional washoku cuisine in a modest and modern restaurant.

Review excerpt: The fare at Kawahara is kaiseki, the traditional multi-course meal, but it is different: For every course over this long lunch, Kawahara does something that’s either thrilling, or mad.

Review excerpt: The titular chef and owner of Karatsu in Kyoto has devoted his life to preparing and serving kaiseki.

Review excerpt: If you’re looking for quality kaiseki at low prices, Tai no Tai is the restaurant should really get to know.

Review excerpt: Depending on the season, the meat at Tokuyamazushi, will be either grilled or cooked in bubbling, warming hot pots as the culmination of multicourse meals that are heavy with local vegetables, wild herbs, mushrooms and fruit.

Review excerpt: Lunch is a slightly pared-down kaiseki meal, but it never feels like chef Nakajima is cutting corners, and includes a lot of seasonal food.

Review excerpt: Sougo's expertise is in shōjin ryōri, the vegetarian temple cooking that traces its roots back to the Zen Buddhist masters of the 13th century.

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