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100 YEARS AGO

Wednesday, Sept. 1, 1920

Ikao fire losses were very heavy

1920 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1920 | THE JAPAN TIMES

Further details received in Tokyo relative to the fire that destroyed the greater part of the pretty mountain village of Ikao state that the fire originated from the burning of a paper lantern, carelessly left outside the Kameya Hotel by one of the maid servants.

The total number of houses razed is estimated at about 250, and the loss is computed to be about ¥4 million. Only about ¥200,000 worth of the destroyed property has been insured.

The almost total destruction of the village is attributed to the scarcity of water, which practically neutralised the efforts of the fire fighters to extinguish the blaze. The conflagration was the greatest that the village of Ikao has known for the past 37 years.

There was one death, a servant being hemmed in by the fire and burnt before help could reach her. The proprietor of the Kameya Hotel also sustained rather serious injuries and is reported to be in a precarious condition.


75 YEARS AGO

Sunday, Sept. 9, 1945

Gen. MacArthur enters U.S. Embassy in Tokyo

1945 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1945 | THE JAPAN TIMES

General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, entered Tokyo in a motorcar on Saturday morning and entered the American Embassy shortly after 11 a.m. The Embassy was strictly guarded by American forces.

A simple ceremony marking the entry of the Supreme Commander was held there shortly after his arrival when the Stars and Stripes was hoisted in the embassy compound.

Prior to the entry of General MacArthur into the capital of Japan, American units at Haramachida in Kanagawa Prefecture proceeded to the American Embassy and other units also made their first entry into Tokyo on the same morning and were stationed at the grounds behind the Meiji Shrine, Yoyogi Parade Grounds and Azabu Third Regimental Barracks.


50 YEARS AGO

Tuesday, Sept. 1, 1970

Alaska peak conquered by Japanese

1970 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1970 | THE JAPAN TIMES

A Japanese alpinist has succeeded in reaching the top of the 6,191-meter Mt. McKinley in Alaska, the highest peak in the North American continent, according to a report reaching the Japan Alpine Club here Sunday.

Naomi Uemura, 29, conquered Mt. McKinley alone, the report said. But the report failed to say when he made the world’s (first) solo ascent of the mountain.

Uemura, together with another Japanese mountaineer, climbed to the summit of Mt. Everest on May 11.

He had previously scaled alone the tallest peaks on three other continents, 4,807-meter Mont Blanc in the European Alps, the 6,010-meter Mt. Kilimanjaro in Africa, and the 6,960-meter Mt. Aconcagua in South America.

The veteran Japanese alpinist left Tokyo July 30 for his attempt on Mt. McKinley.


25 YEARS AGO

Saturday, Sept. 2, 1995

Japan’s women represented by men

1995 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1995 | THE JAPAN TIMES

Japan’s official delegation to the largest-ever women’s conference will be dominated by men.

The delegation leader is a man — Chief Cabinet Secretary Koken Nosaka, 70 — and seven of the 10 main delegates approved by the Cabinet are male.

The government said many delegations to the United Nations conference, which will open Monday in Beijing, will be headed by Cabinet ministers.

However, because there are no women in Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama’s Cabinet, no woman was available for the job.

Murayama’s recently reshuffled coalition administration is the first male-only Cabinet since 1992.

The three female members of the Japanese delegation will be two officials from the Labor Ministry and one from the Foreign Ministry.

Accompanying the delegation is a support staff of about 70 lower-ranking officials, who will mainly handle clerical tasks. Fifty of them are women.

Up to 6,000 Japanese women are attending a parallel conference now in progress an hour’s drive from Beijing. The NGO Forum is made up of nongovernmental organizations from around the world.

“The Murayama administration has zero woman ministers,” the Mainichi Shimbun wrote. “Although aides to the prime minister say he showed enthusiasm for allowing more women into his Cabinet, how is he going to explain the gap between the reality and the ideal?”

In Japan, business and politics are dominated by men. Only 4.3 percent of private-sector managerial positions are held by women, and their wages are about 40 percent lower on average than those of men.

Compiled by Leo Howard. In this feature, we delve into The Japan Times’ 124-year archive to present a selection of stories from the past. The Japan Times’ archive is now available in digital format. For more details, see jtimes.jp/de.

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