National

Total number of COVID-19 cases in Japan surge past 6,000

JIJI

Total cases of novel coronavirus cases in Japan surged past 6,000 on Friday, with record daily increases in Tokyo, Osaka and elsewhere.

The nationwide total stood at 6,141 as of 11 p.m., up 625 from the previous day. The death toll increased by 13 to 132, including those who were aboard the virus-hit Diamond Princess cruise ship.

In Tokyo, which is under a state of emergency, a record 189 cases were reported. About 80 percent or 147 cases, were those in which the transmission routes were unknown.

Among the prefectures also covered by the emergency declaration issued Tuesday by the central government, Osaka reported 80 cases, Saitama 53 cases and Fukuoka 39 cases, all single-day records.

Tottori Prefecture also recorded its first coronavirus case, making Iwate the last of the country's 47 prefectures to have no reported infections.

In the city of Kumamoto, a hospitalized patient in his 70s became the first to die from the coronavirus in Kumamoto Prefecture.

In Fukui Prefecture, two outpatients at a urology clinic in the prefectural capital of the same name tested positive for the virus. A total of six people related to the clinic have been identified as infected.

In the same prefecture, a boy under the age of 10 tested positive after his was also confirmed to be infected.

The latest coronavirus cases in Hyogo included five at a police station in Kobe, where two senior officers had already been found to have the virus.

The Tokyo Metropolitan Government corrected Thursday's number of newly confirmed infection cases to 178 from 181. The Japanese capital's cumulative total was 1,705.

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