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‘You, Your, Yours’: Goofball gags that’ll go over well with goofball guys

by Mark Schilling

Contributing Writer

Love can drive you nuts. One recent illustration of how can be seen in the American TV show “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,” about a successful New York lawyer who runs into her teen crush one day, and soon after quits her job and moves to California to be near him. That is, she becomes his stalker, but would rather die than admit it.

Then there’s “You, Your, Yours,” Daigo Matsui’s goofball comedy about three guys who spend a decade of their lives “protecting” a Korean bar hostess (Kim Kkobbi) from afar. They’re stalkers too, as well as being idiots.

For all its zaniness, with characters bursting into song each episode, “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” is grounded in co-creator and star Rachel Bloom’s real-life struggles with mental illness.

“You, Your, Yours,” by contrast, is squarely in the gag-manga-for-boys school of humor, in which sexual arousal is signaled by bug-eyed hysteria and sudden nosebleeds.

You, Your, Yours (Kimi ga Kimi de Kimi da)
Rating
Run Time 104 mins.
Language JAPANESE

Given the large, mostly male audience for this type of comedy — those manga sell in the millions — the film may not turn into a career flame-out. For this reviewer, however, seeing it was like reliving lunchtime at my high school cafeteria, if with dumber jokes and more obnoxious classmates.

It begins normally enough. Two long-time pals are out drinking when they see a woman (Kim) being harassed. Riding to her rescue, they are promptly thrashed by her harassers, to the woman’s amusement. Our heroes are confused, but infatuated.

Fast-forward 10 years, to an apartment they have converted into a command post for tracking the movements of the woman, whom they have dubbed “Sun” (full character name: Park Young-sun) or “Princess.” They now call themselves Brad Pitt (Shinnosuke Mitsushima) and Yutaka Ozaki (Sosuke Ikematsu). They have also acquired a comrade in arms (Koji Ohkura), a tall, lanky guy who goes by the moniker Ryoma Sakamoto. Ozaki, a singer who died at age 26 in 1992, and Sakamoto, a samurai leader who was assassinated at age 31 in 1867, are both dead legends with huge followings.

Not that the fake Ozaki and Sakamoto have a burning urge to die young. When a glowering gangster (Osamu Mukai) and his languid female boss (You) burst into their lair, the legends and Brad dissolve into quivering masses of cowardly jelly.

The gangster and boss are searching for Sun’s leech of a boyfriend (Mahiro Takasugi) concerning a large debt. But these three “protectors,” they decide, might also serve as income generators.

Flashbacks reveal, but fail to explain, how this trio came to dedicate their lives to Sun. And the story never gets beyond silly.

Sun, meanwhile, initially has as much agency as a princess in a video game. But as she reveals a spikier-than-expected personality, her three protectors’ proclamations of noble motives and feelings “beyond love” begin to look even more deluded. Or shall we say creepy? Yes, we shall.

The three leads — Ikematsu, Mitsushima and Ohkura — have all done good work in other films, though Ohkura is the most gifted comedian (see his failed film producer in Yuki Tanada’s excellent “Round Trip Heart” for proof). And as much as they seem to be enjoying themselves, all are wasted in this one. If you’d rather laugh than cringe, better binge-watch Bloom’s show instead.