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As the United States struggles to understand last September’s attack on its diplomatic mission in Benghazi, which took the lives of four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, a formal investigation has not even been opened in Libya — and likely never will be.

Libya’s leaders face myriad challenges — from a vocal federalist movement in the East, aimed at usurping the central government’s prerogatives, to a wave of assassinations targeting security officials — which leaves them few resources to allocate to a case that does not pose an immediate threat to their domestic standing.

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