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Japanese films about dementia are by now many and, given demographic trends here, interest in the subject is both natural and necessary.

But as seen in “A Long Goodbye,” Ryota Nakano’s drama about a family dealing with the dementia of its once-proud patriarch, dementia has also become a common device for having extracting audience tears. Not that the film, which stars Tsutomu Yamazaki as the patriarch, is a standard weepie. In fact, its subtitle could be “the lighter, brighter side of Alzheimer’s.”

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