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THE BENSHI — Japanese Silent Film Narrators, edited by the Friends of Silent Films Association, with essays by Tadao Sato and Larry Greenberg, and an interview with Midori Sawato. Tokyo: Urban Connections, 2001, 172 pp. with photographs, 1,500 yen (paper)

Despite its name, no silent film was, of course, ever shown silent. There was always, everywhere, something — usually music but often some kind of narration as well. Only in one country, however, did the practice of narration turn into a kind of institution. That was in Japan.

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