Voices | VIEWS FROM THE STREET

Views from Tokyo: Is 'Pokemon Go' here to stay or just a fad?

by Naomi Schanen

Staff Writer

Simon Brewer
English teacher, 30 (British)
It’s dying off a little bit, but I’m sure the creators’ have a few things up their sleeve, like plans on releasing new Pokemon. Compared to existing augmented reality games on the Nintendo 3DS, the accessibility of this game means it’s more likely to stay.

Takao Miura
Consultant, 27 (Japanese)
One second, I’m in the middle of playing Pokemon Go. I jumped to it as soon as it came out in Japan, but I got bored of it pretty quickly. It’s a way to kill time more than anything now. Nevertheless, it’s fun — I feel like a kid again.

Misaki Yuasa
Student, 18 (Japanese)
Everybody around me is still playing it, and I think it’ll take a while for the hype to die down. But, honestly, as long as people are staying out of trouble and spending time outside playing the game, I don’t see a problem with it.

Cristin Allmang
Student, 21 (German)
You see people you wouldn’t usually associate with being gamers, playing “Pokemon Go” — I think it’s great. I’ve always wanted to be able to train and fight with others in this way, so for me, it’s nostalgic and a total dream come true!

Dennis Bernal
Restaurant staff, 43 (Filipino)
With all my friends playing it, I felt like I had to, in order to fit in. It’s getting more popular everyday, especially with the older generations. I’ll admit, it’s addicting, so it requires a lot of self-control, but I don’t regret it — it makes me feel young again!

Manjeet & Satti Gill
30s (British)
We can very much see the appeal, but people need to know their limits and take safety into consideration when playing it to prevent silly accidents. Every hit has its drop, though — it’s most likely just a passing fad.