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Already worked your way through Netflix? Stay home, hunker down and feast on these five literary treats from Japan and beyond, now available in English:

  • Izumi Suzuki, a writer of speculative sci-fi and a 1970s and ’80s counterculture figure, has gone largely overlooked by modern readers — until now, with the release of “Terminal Boredom,” a treasure trove of Suzuki’s subversive work, writes Iain Maloney.
  • Staying with speculative sci-fi, San Francisco-based publisher Two Lines Press has released “That We May Live,” a playfully weird selection of seven contemporary tales from Chinese writers, themed loosely around urban alienation, writes Nicolas Gattig.
Chaucer's Author Chat with Robert Whiting ('Tokyo Junkie'), April 27 | CHAUCER'S BOOKS
Chaucer’s Author Chat with Robert Whiting (‘Tokyo Junkie’), April 27 | CHAUCER’S BOOKS
  • Author and longtime Japan resident Robert Whiting tackles his hardest writing project ever — “interviewing himself” for a memoir on his life, the changing urban landscape — and, of course, baseball. Mark Schreiber talked to him about “Tokyo Junkie.”
  • In his novel “At the End of the Matinee,” Keiichiro Hirano provides a detailed view of politics, culture and economics at the start of the 21st century alongside a story about star-crossed lovers, writes Kris Kosaka.
  • Mizuki Tsujimura’s touching novel about teenage bullying in the Tokyo suburbs, “Lonely Castle in the Mirror,” illuminates the importance of compassion and reaching out, writes Maloney.

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