More Sports / Football

Trump again blasts NFL for anthem protests, claims they're not about racism

Reuters

U.S. President Donald Trump kept up his verbal battle with the National Football League over players who drop to one knee during the national anthem, saying on Monday their acts of protest had nothing to do with racism.

Dozens of NFL players, coaches and even some owners joined in silent protest at games on Sunday against Trump’s call for owners to fire players who do not stand during the “Star-Spangled Banner.”

“The issue of kneeling has nothing to do with race. It is about respect for our Country, Flag and National Anthem. NFL must respect this!” Trump said on Twitter.

Some black athletes disputed that statement.

“It is about race. It is about inequalities in our communities,” Miami Dolphins player Michael Thomas told CNN. “People are going to continue to … voice their opinion.”

Trump kicked off his battle with the largest-grossing U.S. professional sports league at a rally on Friday, when he said any protesting player was a “son of a bitch” who should be “fired.”

White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said that anti-racism protests should not be directed at the flag.

“If the debate is really for them about police brutality, they should protest the officers on the field that are protecting them instead of the American flag,” she said.

The controversy highlighted a deep political rift that Trump’s election has exposed across American society.

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick began kneeling during the anthem in protest of police brutality and racial inequities last year. No NFL team has signed Kaepernick for this season.

Not all players joined in Sunday’s protests. Notably, Pittsburgh Steelers lineman Alejandro Villanueva, a U.S. Army veteran, stood alone at the entrance to the stadium for the anthem on Sunday while his teammates waited in the locker room.

Villanueva jerseys and other apparel have outsold those of all other players in the past 24 hours, said a spokesman for online retailer Fanatics, which operates NFLShop.com.

Villanueva’s teammate, Ben Roethlisberger, on Monday said he regretted having missed the anthem.

“I was unable to sleep last night,” Roethlisberger said in a statement. “As a team, it was not a protest of the flag or the Anthem. I personally don’t believe the Anthem is ever the time to make any type of protest.”

The next test of NFL sentiment comes in Phoenix, Arizona, when the Cardinals host the Dallas Cowboys at 8:30 p.m. EDT (0030 GMT). Neither team has had a player conspicuously kneel during the anthem.

Cowboys owner Jerry Jones has expressed pride that his team has not joined in anthem protests, last month calling other athletes’ actions “really disappointing.”

Trump called for a boycott of games. Early reports from the major networks were mixed.

CBS Corp. said overall viewership of games it broadcast on Sunday was up 4 percent from last year and 1 percent from last week.

NBC, owned by Comcast Corp., said viewership for its Sunday night game was down compared with the prior week.

Prominent players continued to speak out against Trump on Monday.

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, who has said he regards Trump as a friend, on Monday said he disagreed with Trump’s remarks.

“I thought it was just divisive,” Brady told Boston’s WEEI radio.

At the same time as he berated the NFL, Trump praised car-racing league NASCAR, which saw no protests at its Sunday race in New Hampshire.

One of that league’s stars, Dale Earnhardt Jr., responded on Twitter.

“All Americans R granted rights 2 peaceful protests,” Earnhardt wrote. He then quoted the late President John F. Kennedy: “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.”

Coronavirus banner