Top Image
  • SHARE

Residents make their way through the courtyard of giant public housing unit Shibazono Danchi in Kawaguchi, Saitama Prefecture, on Friday. The unit
Residents make their way through the courtyard of giant public housing unit Shibazono Danchi in Kawaguchi, Saitama Prefecture, on Friday. The unit’s demographic mainly consists of young, foreign families and elderly Japanese. | YOSHIAKI MIURA

As Japan becomes a more ethnically diverse and multicultural country, aging communities are grappling with the complexities of how to live with new, young tenants from different cultures. Their trials and tribulations offer insight into how Japan will cope with an expected influx of young, foreign workers in a graying country with limited experience in hosting blue-collar workers.

Staff reporter Sakura Murakami joins Cory Baird and Oscar Boyd to discuss the issue.

Related link: Danchi highlight complexity of Japan’s interculturalism

In a time of both misinformation and too much information, quality journalism is more crucial than ever.
By subscribing, you can help us get the story right.

SUBSCRIBE NOW

PHOTO GALLERY (CLICK TO ENLARGE)