• Kyodo

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Police received 110 reports related to so-called “revenge porn” — posting sexually explicit images of former lovers online — in the first month since a law prohibiting the act took effect in late November, a survey showed Thursday.

Conducted by police between Nov. 27 and Dec. 31 last year, the survey showed that the victims in 65 cases were in their 20s or younger, and that the largest group of perpetrators were those in their 30s. The victims in 99 of the cases were female.

The police have dealt with the crimes by requesting Internet service providers to delete sexual images that were posted without the subject’s consent, warning offenders engaged in revenge porn and advising victims on ways to limit the damage.

Since it is difficult to ensure that such images are deleted once posted online, the police are warning people against allowing others to take explicit pictures without careful consideration, or sending such images voluntarily.

Of the reported revenge porn cases, 42 involved the release or threatened release online of such images without the consent of the victim, while there were 22 cases in which such images were sent by perpetrators to the victims.

The survey also showed that 68 cases were committed by partners or former partners, and 14 cases by someone the victims had only become acquainted with on the Internet.

On Nov. 27, a law to penalize people who have posted explicit images online without the subject’s permission took effect. The measure was taken following a high-profile stalking-murder case in 2013 in Mitaka, western Tokyo, in which Charles Thomas Ikenaga harassed his former girlfriend by posting images of her online before fatally stabbing her.

No charges were laid for violating the law on revenge porn during the period surveyed, but offenders in seven cases were accused of other offenses such as extortion and making threats.

During the first three months of 2015, police said they pressed charges in seven cases of revenge porn.

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