author

 
 
 Cesar Chelala

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Cesar Chelala
Cesar Chelala, MD, PhD, is an international public health consultant for several UN agencies, and a writer on human rights, medical and foreign policy issues. He is a winner of an Overseas Press Club of America Award. His articles have been published in more than 70 countries worldwide.
For Cesar Chelala's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:
Japan Times
COMMENTARY / World
Oct 25, 2016
How to lower your risk for Alzheimer's disease
A healthy diet is the best way to having a healthy mind.
Japan Times
COMMENTARY / World
Oct 23, 2016
The spirit of Nuremberg
Seventy years after the Nuremberg trials, it's time to give teeth to efforts to bring war criminals to justice.
Japan Times
COMMENTARY / World
Oct 5, 2016
Obesity poses a serious threat to kids' health
The world's children are increasingly becoming overweight and obese, with grim consequences for their health.
COMMENTARY / World
Oct 3, 2016
How one man held off nuclear war
A Soviet naval commander's valor and determination saved the world from annihilation.
COMMENTARY / World
Sep 5, 2016
'Cupping' has a long and interesting history
As with other alternative treatments, cupping is as good as it makes you feel.
Japan Times
COMMENTARY / World
Aug 29, 2016
Guantanamo remains a stain on U.S. policy
Insisting on maintaining a facility that has only brought shame and embarrassment to the U.S. is wrong.
COMMENTARY / World
Aug 16, 2016
Silver medalist Del Potro lives up to his name
Juan Martin Del Potro proved once more in Rio that he has the strength and energy of a stallion.
COMMENTARY / World
Aug 13, 2016
Argentina's 'Loony Radio' making waves
A radio program in Argentina that draws 12 million listeners is produced by patients at a psychiatric hospital in Buenos Aires.
COMMENTARY / World
Aug 7, 2016
The critical link between poverty and health
Concern for the health of the poor is one of the critical issues in development policy.
Japan Times
COMMENTARY / World
Jun 20, 2016
America has long fostered a culture of violence
We cannot decry the consequence of our actions if we foster a culture of violence in the United States.
COMMENTARY / World
Jun 18, 2016
Maradona and Pele are wrong about Messi
Argentina's Lionel Messi proves once again he deserves his reputation as one of the three greatest soccer players of all time.
Japan Times
COMMENTARY / World
Jun 5, 2016
The deadly polio virus is now a cancer-killer
A modified polio virus can kill malignant tumors without harming normal cells, since its ability to grow depends on biochemical abnormalities only present in cancer cells.
COMMENTARY / World
May 18, 2016
The world could use more nonintervention
The principle of nonintervention may be extremely difficult to enforce in today's complex world, but its principles should be revived again.
COMMENTARY / World
May 10, 2016
A lesson about truth and justice from Auschwitz
At a trial for a German concentration camp guard, a Holocaust survivor seeks to put truth and justice before his desire for revenge.
COMMENTARY / World
Apr 2, 2016
Excessive dieting can be dangerous to teens
Although dieting can be good for people's health, unsupervised efforts — particularly by adolescents who want to be excessively slim — can be dangerous.
COMMENTARY / World
Mar 28, 2016
Records can shed light on U.S. role in Argentina
U.S. President Barack Obama should be praised for engaging in 'declassified diplomacy.'
Japan Times
COMMENTARY / World
Mar 20, 2016
Bush and Blair should be tried for war crimes
If the tenets of the Nuremberg principles and the Geneva Conventions were applied, both George W. Bush and Tony Blair would most likely be convicted for their roles in the Iraq War.
Japan Times
COMMENTARY / World
Mar 15, 2016
U.S. should stop making, selling cluster bombs
Cluster bombs should be called 'cowards' bombs' because civilians are frequently their victims.
COMMENTARY / World
Mar 1, 2016
In Yemen, a humanitarian pause urgently needed
A humanitarian pause is badly needed in war-torn Yemen, where a majority of the population in urgent need of medical care.
COMMENTARY / World
Feb 13, 2016
Chinese scientists working on autism cure
Chinese scientists have created monkeys with a version of autism that could eventually help in the cure for this complex spectrum of brain disorders.

Longform

Historically, kabuki was considered the entertainment of the merchant and peasant classes, a far cry from how it is regarded today.
For Japan's oldest kabuki theater, the show must go on