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Lawrence Repeta
For Lawrence Repeta's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:
Japan Times
COMMENTARY / Japan
Apr 14, 2020
The coronavirus and Japan’s Constitution
Article 41 provides the government with sufficient power to take aggressive action against the COVID-19 outbreak.
COMMENTARY / Japan
Jan 4, 2017
The silencing of an anti-U.S. base protester in Okinawa
The extended detention of Hiroji Yamashiro is a shocking display of raw government power.
COMMENTARY / Japan
Nov 15, 2015
Construction of an outlaw Marine base in Okinawa
In its eagerness to appease U.S. Marine demands for a super base in northern Okinawa, the Abe administration has cast aside the rules of law.
COMMENTARY / Japan
Nov 26, 2013
State secrecy bill could have a chilling effect on reporting
The state secrecy bill currently before the Diet could have a chilling effect on news reporting in Japan.
COMMENTARY / World
Jan 4, 2013
Wait out passions of the moment when touching up the Constitution
Now that the Liberal Democratic Party and their allies have won a large majority in Japan's House of Representatives, the issue of constitutional revision is on the table.
COMMENTARY / World
Nov 6, 2009
The human rights outlook and new justice minister
Ever since the historic landslide victory of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) in the Lower House elections, we have wondered how the new government will wield its power. In the area of human rights protection, at least, there is cause to expect dramatic change. One of the more startling appointments to the new Cabinet is that of Yokohama lawyer Keiko Chiba as minister of justice. The progressive attitude of the new minister contrasts sharply with what we've seen in the past. Her appointment will be heartily welcomed throughout the global legal community.
COMMENTARY / World
Jun 15, 2002
Defense Agency deals democracy a blow
The mushrooming scandal at Japan's Defense Agency highlights the ongoing struggle between advocates of free speech and government secrecy. The clumsy and duplicitous handling of this affair by the Koizumi administration leaves even the most cynical observers of government speechless.

Longform

Hideo Shimoju points to a possible site that his fellow neighbors may relocate to. Such relocations have happened before, but not preemptively.
In disaster-prone Japan, some communities consider major moves