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Russell Working
For Russell Working's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:
COMMENTARY / World
Jul 26, 2003
Killers in U.S. rely on mercy of Mexico
LOS ANGELES -- Anabella Vara was pregnant at 14 and married at 15, and by the time she was 21 she was living in fear. On Valentine's Day 1999 her husband, Daniel Perez, looped a rope around her neck and tried to strangle her. She and her 5-year-old son fled to her parents' house, but two months later he kidnapped her at gunpoint and shot her in the head.
COMMENTARY / World
Jan 12, 2003
Closest point to bridging an ethnic divide
PYLA, Cyprus -- Maksim Restaurant sits on the United Nations "green line," which separates the Greek and Turkish sides of this divided island, but it's a popular stop for members of both ethnic groups.
COMMENTARY / World
Dec 14, 2002
City of hope for Russian Muslims and Jews
KAZAN, Russia -- It was a time of turmoil in Russia's Tatar Autonomous Republic. In 1994, local officials were demanding independence for the historically Muslim region, and taxpayer dollars were rebuilding mosques that had been converted to warehouses during Soviet times.
COMMENTARY / World
Nov 18, 2002
Only bitter solutions remain in Chechnya
LIMASSOL, Cyprus -- Europeans have a way of knowing what's best for other peoples' conflicts but facing their own crises with ineptitude, and there is no better demonstration of this than their attitude to the war in Chechnya.
COMMENTARY / World
Nov 3, 2002
Russian youth dodge conscript military
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- It took a while to get the young deserter to talk. Roman had fled his army unit and was staying with Tatiana Barykina and her family, and they could see the scars on his wrist and sense the pain that hung upon him like a millstone.
COMMENTARY / World
Oct 27, 2002
War talk doesn't faze Tatar oil people
KAZAN, Russia -- The Tatar Autonomous Republic is an area where minarets rise above the whitewashed kremlin walls, where Muslim villagers have pitched in to construct more than 1,000 mosques over the decade since the Soviet Union fell apart.
COMMENTARY / World
Sep 30, 2002
Give democracy a chance in postwar Iraq
LIMASSOL, Cyprus -- In recent months, the Iraqi debate has played in the news like a tennis match, with observers awarding points to U.S. President George W. Bush for his U.N. speech, then to Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein for his shrewd move to admit inspectors "without conditions" -- subject, of course, to further negotiation.
COMMENTARY / World
Aug 25, 2002
Republican 'criticism' no war-stopper
LIMASSOL, Cyprus -- An interesting debate broke out in Washington last week about the possible war against Iraq. The discussion isn't just about whether to go to war; it has morphed into a quarrel about whether top Republicans are breaking ranks with U.S. President George W. Bush and seeking to reverse the march toward war.
COMMENTARY / World
Aug 17, 2002
Iran hardly qualifies for the 'evil' club
LIMASSOL, Cyprus -- Earlier this year, U.S. President George W. Bush granted Iran a membership card in the "axis of evil" -- a triad of nations so iniquitous that they deserved to be cast out of the world community.
Japan Times
LIFE / Travel
Aug 6, 2002
Tussling over a stolen treasure
ATHENS -- In 1801, Thomas Bruce, the seventh Earl of Elgin and British ambassador to Constantinople, hit upon what he considered a splendid idea.
COMMENTARY / World
Jul 27, 2002
Gov. Davis goes where Bush fears to tread
LIMASSOL, Cyprus -- A remarkable event occurred this week in California -- one that should cheer environmentalists around the world who were angered by the Bush administration's rejection of the Kyoto treaty on global warming.
COMMENTARY / World
Jul 4, 2002
The Cyprus connection: How Milosevic evaded arms sanctions
NICOSIA, Cyprus -- On Dec. 27, 1998, a Yugoslav named Drakomir Stojkovic flew from Belgrade to Cyprus's Larnaca airport on a private jet carrying bags stuffed with 35 million deutsche marks -- worth roughly $17 million.
Japan Times
LIFE / Travel
May 28, 2002
North of the border, Chinese reap a rich harvest
LAZAREVSKOYE, Russia -- In order to enter Lu Binzheng's pig farm, visitors have to dress in white lab coats, stand under an ultraviolet light to kill any germs and slosh their shoes in disinfectant.
LIFE / Travel
May 28, 2002
North of the border, Chinese reap a rich harvest
LAZAREVSKOYE, Russia -- In order to enter Lu Binzheng's pig farm, visitors have to dress in white lab coats, stand under an ultraviolet light to kill any germs and slosh their shoes in disinfectant.
COMMENTARY / World
Apr 27, 2002
Greek Cypriots bluster over Israeli snub
NICOSIA -- At first glance, Cyprus might seem a likely friend for Israel in a hostile region. An eastern Mediterranean island just 105 km from Syria, the Republic of Cyprus is a democracy with a free press, thriving banking and shipping industries, and a per capita gross domestic product of $16,000, approaching that of Israel.
COMMENTARY / World
Apr 18, 2002
Israeli offensive shakes Jordanian society
GAZA REFUGEE CAMP, Jordan -- Gloom hung over the house where Amin's adult daughter had died of an unknown disease. Rain was leaking through the tarpaulin that served as a roof in half of the two-room structure of mud brick and cinder blocks where 15 people live.
COMMENTARY / World
Apr 11, 2002
Threat of new Iraqi war has neighboring Turkey on edge
ANKARA -- At his shop in the ancient citadel of this busy capital city, Satilimish Sutchuoglu and three fellow carpet sellers gather to drink tea and trade forecasts of economic doom.
COMMENTARY / World
Mar 31, 2002
Who can blame U.S. for going it alone?
ATHENS -- It was a curious political moment in the cradle of democracy. A recent visit by Iranian President Mohammad Khatami sparked a flood of favorable media coverage about Iran -- and an avalanche of condemnation of America.
COMMENTARY / World
Mar 8, 2002
Propaganda fuels Muslim anti-Semitism
NEW YORK -- It was, by all accounts, a heinous conclusion to a barbaric crime. The Pakistani kidnappers of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl forced him to state that he was a Jew and his mother and father were Jews. Then, having laid out their legal case, the killers slit his throat and beheaded him.
COMMENTARY / World
Dec 30, 2001
Russia's free press loses another battle
LIMASSOL, Cyprus -- In July 2000, I joined Russian reporter Grigory Pasko and two carloads of fellow journalists in a visit to Irina Grebneva, a newspaper editor who had been jailed for five days in the Pacific port of Vladivostok, Russia. Her crime was making the governor look stupid and corrupt by printing a foul-mouthed rant in which he promised to help an ally steal the mayoral election.

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