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In the aftermath of last week’s massacre of 50 Muslims at a mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, it has become common to equate white nationalism with radical Islam. A typical comment came from U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren: “In the same way that ISIS and al-Qaida terrorism pose a threat to the U.S.,” she said, “so does the rise of white nationalism.”

This perspective is understandable. Right-wing extremist violence is a major domestic threat. According to the Anti-Defamation League’s database, it has accounted for about 73 percent of terrorist-related murders in the U.S. in the last 10 years.

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