• Kitanagoya, Aichi

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News about whether Prime Minister Naoto Kan will retire or not has been reported every day. There is a big gap between the government and the people. What politicians are discussing goes against the will of the people. Politicians have to notice that people are moving away from government. People are looking on coldly, wondering what politicians think they are doing.

We have a lot of problems that must be dealt with immediately such as nuclear power plant safety, power shortages, reconstruction of the quake-hit areas and so on. If Kan retires, will the situation change for the better? I don’t think so. Is there anyone able to do a better job as prime minister? I don’t think so.

According to a newspaper survey, the number of people who agree with Kan’s resignation announcement is 52 percent. Yet, 61 percent don’t think the situation will improve with a new prime minister. I’m not a Kan supporter, but that’s not the issue. I worry about Japan’s future, and at this rate, the future looks hopeless.

I became old enough to be aware of the prime minister’s office during the Koizumi administration. Since Junichiro Koizumi left (2006), the post has changed hands several times in short succession. That’s quite unusual, but it now seems natural for our generation. Japanese politics is wandering.

I don’t know whether the Koizumi government was good or not, but I felt that people were at least strongly united compared to today. Younger people especially are giving up on changing politics and are losing hope. The number of people interested in becoming politicians in present-day Japan is becoming fewer and fewer. I don’t put everything down to politics, but there are few chances to change it. Politicians must think about the future, too.

The opinions expressed in this letter to the editor are the writer’s own and do not necessarily reflect the policies of The Japan Times.

saki yamagami