• Bloomberg

  • SHARE

Tao Xiaorong spent a month’s rent to buy her 12-year-old son a used laptop in February, a few weeks after schools in Hong Kong closed and classes went virtual. But their internet service is so spotty that he’s had trouble participating in online classes.

“He was very frustrated and used it as an excuse to not study hard,” said Tao, a single mother raising her son on government subsidies in a one-room, 100-square-foot apartment in Sham Shui Po, one of the city’s poorest neighborhoods. “His exam scores are often below average. I’m afraid it’ll get worse after this.”

In a time of both misinformation and too much information, quality journalism is more crucial than ever.
By subscribing, you can help us get the story right.

SUBSCRIBE NOW

PHOTO GALLERY (CLICK TO ENLARGE)