• The Associated Press

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In the race to create ever thinner displays for TVs, cell phones and other gadgets, Sony may have developed one to beat them all — a razor-thin display that bends like paper while showing full-color video.

Sony Corp. posted video of the new display on its Web page Friday. The 0.3-mm display is shown being squeezed by a hand as it shows color video of a bicyclist stuntman, picturesque lake and other images.

Sony is presenting the research and video at an academic symposium Friday in Long Beach, Calif., for the Society for Information Display, the electronics and entertainment giant said in a release.

The display combines Sony’s organic thin-film transistor, or TFT, technology, which is used to make flexible displays, with another kind of technology called organic electroluminescence, it said.

The latter technology is not as widespread for gadgets as the two main display technologies now on the market — liquid crystal displays and plasma display panels.

Although flat-panel TVs are getting slimmer, a display that’s so thin it bends in a human hand marks a breakthrough for Sony.

Sony said plans for a commercial product using the technology were still on the drawing board.

Sony President Ryoji Chubachi has said a filmlike display is a major technology the company is pursuing to boost its status as a technological powerhouse.

In a meeting with reporters more than a year ago, he boasted that Sony was working on a technology for displays so thin they could be rolled up like paper, and that the world would stand up and take notice.

Some analysts have said Sony, maker of the Walkman portable stereo and PlayStation 3 video game machines, had fallen behind rivals in flat-panel technology, including Sharp Corp. and South Korea’s Samsung Electronics Co.

But Sony has been working to reverse that under Chubachi and CEO Howard Stringer.

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