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Thu-Huong Ha
Thu-Huong Ha is the culture critic at The Japan Times, focusing on contemporary art and fiction. Previously she was a reporter for Quartz, an editor for TED.com and an executive producer of TEDxNewYork. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Wired, The Believer, and ArtReview, among others. Her debut novel, "Hail Caesar," was published by Scholastic/PUSH in 2007. Get in touch: [email protected] or instagram.com/whatthusee.
For Thu-Huong Ha's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books
Nov 26, 2022
'I Want to Die but I Want to Eat Tteokbokki': Compelling confessions of an exhausted millennial
South Korean author Baek Sehee's bestselling mental health memoir is uncomfortably vulnerable and compulsively readable.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books
Nov 16, 2022
Do you have what it takes to be a novelist? Let Haruki Murakami decide.
In “Novelist as a Vocation,” the prolific author paints himself as an everyman while giving frustratingly unclear advice on being a professional writer.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Art
Nov 8, 2022
Notes from Setouchi: At Naoshima, three giants of Japanese art wrestle for attention
In spaces that opened earlier this year on Naoshima, the severe architecture of Tadao Ando brings a new edge to the art of Yayoi Kusama and Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Japan Times
LIFE / Travel
Nov 1, 2022
Review: Is the new Ghibli Park worth all the hype?
The new theme park in Aichi Prefecture signals a change of direction for the legendary animation studio as it prepares for the next phase of Hayao Miyazaki's legacy.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Art
Oct 28, 2022
Notes from Setouchi: An autumnal spectacle of light and shadow
Artworks in abandoned houses play with the natural light found on the islands in the Seto Inland Sea.
Japan Times
LIFE / Travel
Oct 28, 2022
Notes from Setouchi: The art of loss brings lesser-known islands to life
Honjima, Takamijima, Awashima and Ibukijima open for the fall season of Setouchi Triennale 2022.
Japan Times
LIFE / Travel
Oct 13, 2022
A first look inside Japan's new Ghibli Park
Unlike at the existing Ghibli Museum in Tokyo, visitors to the theme park will be able to take photos with beloved characters such as Cat Bus, Totoro and No Face to their heart's content.
Japan Times
COMMUNITY / Our Lives / 20 QUESTIONS
Oct 7, 2022
Yoshio Osakabe: ‘There are probably a lot of old fans who actually don't want Murakami to win the Nobel’
Coined 'Harukisuto,' or 'Haruki-ists,' for their passionate devotion to Haruki Murakami, one fan talks about the joy he gets from the work of one of Japan's most-treasured authors.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Art
Sep 21, 2022
The Aichi Triennale as seen through four textures
The arts festival's conceptual works stand in stark contrast to its tactile pieces, from marimba-like instruments to ceramic interpretations of bombs, presented at the Aichi Arts Center.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Art
Sep 21, 2022
Japanese folk art opens a door to Black American identity
American artist Theaster Gates introduces 'Afro-mingei,' an aesthetic that combines Black identity and Japanese craft art, to the Aichi Triennale.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Art
Sep 9, 2022
Kohei Nawa's gross and gorgeous 'Force' mesmerizes the senses
The bewitching interplay of light, sound and smell in the artist's installation of cascading black ink offers a dynamism that is lost in any attempt to capture the art in a still photo.
Japan Times
COMMUNITY / Issues / THE FOREIGN ELEMENT
Sep 5, 2022
What to say to a coworker who's having a mental health issue
September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and with the pandemic taking a toll on mental health globally, it's important to know how to support a coworker who might be struggling.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Film / Wide Angle
Aug 19, 2022
Ghost of Tsushima casting prompts the question: Who is — and isn’t — Japanese?
Director Chad Stahelski says he wants a Japanese cast speaking Japanese, but pulling it off would mean navigating the murky waters of identity.

Longform

Historically, kabuki was considered the entertainment of the merchant and peasant classes, a far cry from how it is regarded today.
For Japan's oldest kabuki theater, the show must go on