• SHARE

100 YEARS AGO

Saturday, Nov. 5, 1921

Premier dies from assassin’s blow, his heart pierced by dagger wielded by crazed youth in the presence of many

Takashi Hara, Premier of Japan since September 30, 1918, was stabbed to death by an assassin at half past seven o’clock Friday evening, just as he was about to board a train for Kyoto. The Premier was pierced to the heart, death coming instantly.

The assassin, a youth named Konichi Nakaoka, nineteen years old, a railroad employee from the Otsuka suburb, was captured red-handed, his crime having taken place in the presence of a large number of people. Little is permitted for publication concerning the direct motive for the murder of the Premier, but it is generally believed that the youth was mentally unbalanced and that the political attacks upon the Premier, which he had read, turned his weak mind into the channel of assassination.

The Premier’s body crumpled and sank to the floor, death being instantaneous. No word and no exclamation passed his lips after the blow was struck. His limp form was hurriedly carried back into the station master’s office and medical assistance sought, but the weapon had pierced the heart, entering the left breast just above the fourth rib.

1921 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1921 | THE JAPAN TIMES

75 YEARS AGO

Monday, Nov. 4, 1946

Japan takes first stride forward to democracy as new Constitution promulgation marked at rites

Utmost solemnity marked the ceremony celebrating the promulgation of the new Japanese Constitution which was held at the Peers Chamber of the Diet building at 11 a.m. Sunday.

The historic function was observed in an atmosphere charged with subdued emotion and keen realization of the grave character of the occasion.

His Majesty the Emperor arrived at the hall at 11 a.m. sharp. He was clad in the dark-blue Imperial uniform and wore the insignia of the Grand Order of the Chrysanthemum.

At 11:04 a.m., the Emperor began reading the rescript announcing the promulgation of the new supreme law. He spoke in his usually sonorous voice which reached the corners of the hall. The message was framed in colloquial style and the Emperor read it with standard accent.

As he finished reading, Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida reverently proceeded to the Imperial dais to receive the document. Yoshida then read his response to the Imperial message.

1946 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1946 | THE JAPAN TIMES

50 YEARS AGO

Monday, Nov. 15, 1971

Radicals, cops clash in Tokyo; 312 held

A total of 312 student radicals, including 61 coeds, were taken into custody during clashes with riot police in Tokyo Sunday, police reported.

The Metropolitan Police Department said 40 persons were injured, 12 of whom were hospitalized.

Of them 21 were policemen, seven of whom were hospitalized, six were students, three of whom were in hospital and 13 others were onlookers, two of whom were admitted to hospital.

Damaged in the clashes were seven police boxes, two ward offices and 15 private houses.

According to the National Police Agency, protest demonstrations were held at 80 places throughout the nation with about 72,300 persons attending.

Five others were arrested in Sendai, another in Fukuoka and two others in Sapporo.

The students, protesting against the Japan-U.S. Okinawa reversion agreement, which is now being debated in the Diet, used various guerrilla tactics, including hurling of Molotov cocktails.

1971 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1971 | THE JAPAN TIMES

25 YEARS AGO

Wednesday, Nov. 6, 1996

Air Max: thieves, gougers just do it

The trend conscious should watch their step — if they’re wearing Nike Air Max shoes.

As the popularity of the U.S. firm’s sneakers continues, so do reports of youths wearing the shoes being targeted by muggers and of those seeking a pair falling prey to swindlers.

In Osaka, where students are terrorized and robbed of their popular footwear in what has become known as Air Max hunting, at least four such juvenile crimes have been reported since mid-September.

In September in the city’s Sumiyoshi Ward, six teenagers on three motorcycles approached a 15-year-old high school student from behind. Four of the assailants grabbed the victim’s hands and legs while the other two took his 1995 Air Max sneakers, police said.

Isamu Moji, a spokesman for the Osaka Prefectural Police, urges caution.

“Air Max hunting thefts could go beyond minor mugging and result in injuries,” he said. “The muggers are going for more than just a pair of shoes — they take whatever they can get their hands on.”

1996 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1996 | THE JAPAN TIMES

Compiled by Shaun McKenna. In this feature, we delve into The Japan Times’ 125-year archive to present a selection of stories from the past. The Japan Times’ archive is now available in digital format. For more details, see jtimes.jp/de.

In a time of both misinformation and too much information, quality journalism is more crucial than ever.
By subscribing, you can help us get the story right.

SUBSCRIBE NOW

PHOTO GALLERY (CLICK TO ENLARGE)