• staff report, Jiji

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Tokyo confirmed 392 new COVID-19 cases on Monday as the cumulative number of infections nationwide exceeded the 200,000 mark amid a third wave that has spread across Japan.

The figure in Tokyo was a record for a Monday, besting the previous high, 314, set on Nov. 23.

The ominous benchmarks came as the total number of virus-linked fatalities reached 2,930 as of Monday afternoon.

Of Monday’s total in the capital, people 65 or older numbered 50, while the number of severely ill patients based on Tokyo’s standards came to 63, down three from the previous day. Tokyo’s daily figure was based on 5,920 tests, the metropolitan government said in a statement.

Among the new cases, people in their 20s made up the largest group at 101, followed by 97 for people in their 30s and 58 among people in their 40s. The cumulative number of infections in the capital stood at 51,838.

After the country’s first COVID-19 infection was confirmed on Jan. 16., it took seven months for the nationwide infection tally to top 50,000, on Aug. 10, and 80 more days for the tally to surpass 100,000, on Oct. 29. As the pace of infections started to accelerate further in November, the nationwide tally rose by 50,000 in 33 days to hit 150,000 on Dec. 1, and climbed by another 50,000 in about three weeks.

Of the country’s 47 prefectures, Tokyo has registered the largest number of COVID-19 cases so far, followed by Osaka, Kanagawa, Aichi and Hokkaido. Akita and Tottori are the only prefectures with fewer than 100 cases. In the capital, the monthly number of new cases exceeded 10,000 for the first time this month.

On Sunday, a total of 2,501 new cases were confirmed across Japan, while 36 deaths linked to the coronavirus were reported the same day. The number of severely ill patients, meanwhile, fell five from the previous day to 593.

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