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Shimmer and glimmer have been around long enough for their glint and sparkle to start to seem a bit boring, don’t you think?

The shine is not about to depart from our beauty counters and skin quite yet — there are legions of glitter fans out there still — although there are hints that we are ready for a change. But where does one go from dazzle? The natural, neutral, nude look might seem a logical next move, but we saw it so recently that it lacks the power of freshness that a new look needs.

My guess is that we will want perhaps to tone down the shimmering shades to their subtlest essence and at the same time get some bravado going in our use of pure, vibrant color. The technologically advanced prismatic and reflective foundations and powders that have been out for a while offer a magical combination of luminosity and softness, creating an illusion of a flawless otherworldly glow. These products are becoming more perfectly realized even as we speak.

Lancome, Prescriptives and Shiseido all offer products in this category. Shiseido’s formulations are particularly fine and subtle, and that is the quality to seek out.

When it comes to color, there is adventure afoot. Shu Uemura, ever a master in this area, describes the new urge for color as an audacious one, and his colors are both romantic and wildly avant-garde, especially the pinks, purples, violets and shades of rose that are meant for the eyes as well as the lips. The colors have the exuberance of spring flowers as imagined by an artistic child. Rather than being sweetly boring, they have presence and pizazz.

Other colors are well-represented too: turquoises, zippy golds and a rainbow of other fiercely crayon-hued shadows. Strong pinks and violets like Uemura’s are also appearing in other lines: Check out Chanel’s nail varnish in Rose Pimpant and Armani’s Pink Sheer lipstick. A new way to wear these vivid pinks is with a bronze complexion, and many companies are reporting brisk sales of bronzing powders and tan-look foundations.

Easter-egg colors, candy colors, innocent ’70s colors, paintbox colors: However you define them, they are popping up everywhere, just like the first spring flowers. You’ll notice that they are meant to be used in unlikely ways — as a swathe of eye shadow that makes no attempt to seem natural, or in a lip design that plays with sci-fi exoticism.

Let’s be playful, enthusiastic and energetic, let’s be new — this is what the colors seem to say. They look like fun. Who’s going to be the first to try them out? Being audacious is the whole point.