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With the recent announcement by North Korean authorities that they had successfully tested a hydrogen bomb, Keiji Nakazawa’s classic anti-nuclear manga, “Barefoot Gen,” once again deserves a full reading — both for newcomers or for those revisiting its brilliance.

Nakazawa vividly records how communities will both unite and divide during war and its aftermath, and he left a legacy as poignant and potent now — with Syria’s starving cities and fear-mongering in Europe and America — as it was in the aftermath of World War II.

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