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Even for those without children, “Teaching Embodied” offers cultural insights that explain many fascinating details of Japan’s group society. From amae (dependence) to omoiyari (empathy) and even passivity — how the Japanese prefer mimamoru (watching and guarding) to interfering or intervening.

Organized in six thematic chapters — “dealing with an aspect of how Japanese teachers think, act and talk about the role they play in children’s social-emotional development” — the book records the experiences of three different Japanese preschool teachers.

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