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Fuminori Nakamura has won many of the major literary prizes in Japan and is quickly making the same kind of impact in the English-speaking world. His third novel to be translated into English, “Last Winter, We Parted,” is out now. It’s a tense, layered story centered around a young writer commissioned by his editor to write about photographer Yudai Kiharazaka, in prison for murdering two women.

For readers familiar with Nakamura’s work, “Last Winter, We Parted” shows a writer maturing and flexing his talent. His stripped-down prose and direct style drop the reader straight into his nightmare. In contrast with Nakamura’s previous two translated books, the Oe Kenzaburo Prize-winning “The Thief” and “Evil and the Mask,” “Last Winter, We Parted” is full of stylistic flourishes and structural experimentation. There are textual games throughout the book, as it switches from archived letters to internal monologue to reported speech to notes from a diary and chains of tweets. It’s a book that keeps its secrets until the last page, playing games with the reader. Structurally it’s a Mobius strip. It must have taken a lot of planning and head-scratching.

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