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Here’s a catch-up on goings-on in the Japanese justice system, including some important judgments:

  • Lawmaker Anri Kawai was sentenced Thursday to a year and four months in prison, suspended for five years, for buying votes in the 2019 Upper House election. The ruling and findings in her trial are expected to affect the case of her husband, Katsuyuki Kawai, a former justice minister who has been tried separately over accusations he handed out about ¥29 million to buy votes.
  • The Tokyo District Court ruled Thursday that Japan’s nationality law, which forbids citizens from holding multiple nationalities, is constitutional. Dual citizenship “could cause conflict in the rights and obligations between countries, as well as between the individual and the state,” said the presiding judge. The ruling is believed to be the first to address the issue.
Anri Kawai sentenced to one year and four months in prison, suspended for five years | NI TERE NEWS
Anri Kawai sentenced to one year and four months in prison, suspended for five years | NI TERE NEWS
  • The Tokyo High Court on Thursday ordered the operator of the wrecked Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant to pay damages to evacuated residents, but it overturned a lower court ruling that also acknowledged the government’s responsibility for the 2011 nuclear crisis. The decision was the first high court ruling to absolve the state of responsibility.
  • A couple in Saitama Prefecture were arrested for allegedly neglecting their 3-month-old daughter and not seeking medical attention, causing her death, police said Wednesday. The police said the father admitted to injuring the daughter and quoted him as saying, “I didn’t seek medical treatment (for her) because I didn’t want to be arrested for abusing” her.
  • Tokyo police arrested two Chinese exchange students Tuesday for their alleged involvement in fraudulent money withdrawals related to mobile phone carrier NTT Docomo’s Koza e-money service. About ¥7.9 million has been fraudulently withdrawn from some 30 deposit accounts of multiple banks in Tokyo, and police believe the pair were part of a larger group of scammers.

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