Tag - that

 
 

THAT

Japan Times
WORLD
Mar 14, 2022
Ukraine now using Clearview AI’s facial recognition technology during war
Ukraine is receiving free access to Clearview AIu2019s powerful search engine for faces, letting authorities potentially vet people of interest at checkpoints, among other uses.
Japan Times
COMMUNITY / Issues / THE FOREIGN ELEMENT
Feb 9, 2021
New trends in 'J-vlogging' allow for a more diverse range of views on Japan
YouTubers based in Japan are focusing less on the "slice of life" videos that defined past content and are catering to smaller communities within the non-Japanese audience.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Film
Jun 11, 2020
‘The 12 Day Tale of the Monster that Died in 8’: Little beasts battle COVID-19 online
Film production in Japan shut down in early April as part of the response to the outbreak of COVID-19, and as weeks passed with no signs of an immediate revival, filmmakers began to adapt to the situation by making “isolation” films.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books
Aug 26, 2017
'The Part of Me That Isn't Broken Inside': A hard look at the dark in the human psyche
Ennui and existential loneliness have become synonymous with contemporary Japanese literature, and those sentiments receive one of their most direct treatments in this newly translated novel from 2002. "The Part of Me That Isn't Broken Inside" is as unrelentingly bleak as its title suggests.
Japan Times
LIFE / Digital
Jun 3, 2016
That Japanese Man Yuta uses YouTube to show us what Japan really thinks
Almost every weekend, Yuta Aoki heads to Tokyo's Shibuya Ward armed with a camera, a stabilizer and a microphone. His mission is to find and speak to Japanese people, but they must look happy or, at least, not busy — "I don't want any trouble," he says with a laugh. He's hunting for opinions: "Is 'gaijin' an offensive term?" "What do you think of tattoos?" On a good day, 1 in every 10 people will stop to chat.

Longform

Hideo Shimoju points to a possible site that his fellow neighbors may relocate to. Such relocations have happened before, but not preemptively.
In disaster-prone Japan, some communities consider major moves