Tag - science

 
 

SCIENCE

Japan Times
LIFE / Lifestyle / CHILD'S PLAY
Jun 20, 2014
Creative approach brings science to life in Osaka
Last month I wrote about Kansai's Big Bang museum, but that's not the only place in the region that uses science to entertain. Smack in the middle of downtown Osaka you'll find two other great places for educational fun: the Osaka Science Museum and Kids Plaza Osaka.
COMMENTARY / World
Jun 17, 2014
A requiem for technocracy
Now that science's postwar charisma has faded, politicians are debating the safety of genetically modified foods, the hazards of extracting shale oil and gas, and the impact of global warming without regard for scientific evidence — as if the issues were morality plays.
Japan Times
JAPAN / Science & Health / NATURAL SELECTIONS
Jun 14, 2014
The hormone behind man's best friend
The other day I saw a picture of a dead dog on Twitter. Gross, right? Not at all, for this wasn't just any old dog: This was Hachiko, perhaps the most famous dog in the world, and certainly the most famous in Japan.
Japan Times
LIFE / Lifestyle
May 16, 2014
Osaka museum offers Big Bang for your buck
Tokyo is teeming with opportunities for families to learn and play, but the nation's capital doesn't have a monopoly on educational fun.
Japan Times
JAPAN
Apr 24, 2014
Obama urges science students to bolster U.S.-Japan ties
Visiting U.S. President Barack Obama expressed hope Thursday that Japanese students will work closely with their U.S. peers to continue their tradition of cooperation over scientific and technological breakthroughs.
JAPAN
Apr 19, 2014
Novelist EnJoe given special citation by Philip K. Dick sci-fi award
Novelist Toh EnJoe was awarded a special citation from the administrators of the 2014 Philip K. Dick Award for science fiction published in the United States, his publisher said Saturday.
Japan Times
JAPAN / Science & Health / NATURAL SELECTIONS
Apr 19, 2014
Now is the time to research Alzheimer's
The team leader at the Laboratory for Proteolytic Neuroscience at Riken's Brain Science Institute is not a man usually given to making apocalyptic statements.
Japan Times
JAPAN / Science & Health
Apr 16, 2014
Obokata mentor, co-author: STAP cells just a ‘hypothesis’
Though evidence points to the existence of STAP cells, they are still only a hypothesis worthy of study, a co-author of the papers on the revolutionary but unproved method to create pluripotent stem cells says.
Japan Times
JAPAN
Feb 13, 2014
Researchers find key Alzheimer's protein
A research team from institutions in Japan and Germany has identified a protein in the brain that may lower the risk of Alzheimer's disease, raising hopes of improved prevention and treatment, according to a study published Thursday.
Japan Times
JAPAN
Dec 29, 2013
Science Club leaving schools behind
Mio Kawamura spends much of his free time differently than his elementary school classmates.
Japan Times
JAPAN
Oct 31, 2013
Another study report on Novartis drug found inappropriate
Shiga University of Medical Science on Thursday became the third Japanese institution to conclude that a clinical study report on Novartis Pharma K.K.'s Diovan blood pressure-lowering drug contained doubtful data and was inappropriate.
Japan Times
JAPAN
Oct 22, 2013
All-English science contest gives young researchers way to connect
When University of Tokyo student Mugiko Komatsuda appeared on stage at a science contest in Tokyo last week, she dazzled the crowd with her self-confidence, resonant voice and radiant smile.
WORLD / Science & Health
Oct 11, 2013
Is that why men have low voices?
It's the rutting season. Red deer hinds will be gathering, and the stags have but one thing on their minds. A mature male that has netted himself a harem is very dedicated. He practically stops eating, focusing instead on keeping his hinds near and his competitors at bay. If you're a red deer stag, one of the ways you make sure that your adversaries know you mean business — and that you're big — is roaring.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books
Sep 21, 2013
Impressive evocations of anxiety, claustrophobia
What if the long-term survival of the human race depended on thousands of Americans being relocated to a vast underground city, with giant TV screens broadcasting a desolate landscape outside and no one allowed to leave?
Japan Times
WORLD / Science & Health
Sep 13, 2013
Neuroscientists reveal the sexiest parts of the body
The mind, said Raquel Welch, is an erogenous zone. And it is the brain, and how it organizes our erogenous zones, that has intrigued scientists for decades. Why is a nuzzled neck sexy when few would be turned on by a nuzzled nose? And why do men seem to have fewer erogenous zones than women? A new study has measured just how erotic our body bits are — and there are a few surprises for neuroscientists.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books
Sep 7, 2013
Atwood is often lyrical, but ultimately indulgent
This is the third in Margaret Atwood's science fiction trilogy, which started with "Oryx and Crake" and progressed to "The Year of the Flood." The title of the third, MaddAddam, you will notice, is a palindrome. There is plenty of wordplay to come.
Japan Times
WORLD / Science & Health
Sep 6, 2013
Science's great unknowns: 20 unsolved questions
What is the universe made of? Astronomers face an embarrassing conundrum: they don't know what 95 percent of the universe is made of. Atoms, which form everything we see around us, only account for a measly 5 percent. Over the past 80 years it has become clear that the substantial remainder is comprised of two shadowy entities — dark matter and dark energy. The former, first discovered in 1933, acts as an invisible glue, binding galaxies and galaxy clusters together. Unveiled in 1998, the latter is pushing the universe's expansion to ever greater speeds. Astronomers are closing in on the true identities of these unseen interlopers.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Entertainment news
Sep 4, 2013
Acclaimed sci-fi author Frederik Pohl dies at 93
Frederik Pohl, who helped shape and popularize science fiction as an influential agent, editor and award-winning author, died Sept. 2 at a hospital near his home in Palatine, Illinois. He was 93.
EDITORIALS
Aug 30, 2013
Collider project needs consensus
Given its enormous financial cost, scientists and politicians must discuss the merits and demerits of hosting the ILC in Japan in a concrete and transparent manner before any final decision is made.
COMMENTARY / World
Aug 23, 2013
Science and politics make for a poisonous mix
Why would a psychology professor believe that science is under attack for its arrogance, vulgarity and narrow vision — from intellectuals and anti-intellectuals alike

Longform

Historically, kabuki was considered the entertainment of the merchant and peasant classes, a far cry from how it is regarded today.
For Japan's oldest kabuki theater, the show must go on