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Date of publication: Mar 5, 2018

Francilien Victorin

Charge d’Affaires ad interim
Embassy of the Republic of Haiti
www.ahaitijapon.org

Date of birth: Feb. 24, 1966

Hometown: Saint Louis du Nord, Haiti

Number of years in Japan (cumulative): 1 (as of December 2017)

Francilien Victorin
Q1: What was your first encounter with Japan?

The people in Japan impressed me. As soon as I arrived, I took the train from Narita International Airport to Tokyo. I brought three suitcases. My travel documents and money were inside one. By the time I put two of the three into the train, it left. I was panicking. Someone helped me to get my belongings back after contacting the train’s operator. That was amazing. 

Q2: Please state your motto in life and why you have chosen it.

I use the Haitian national motto of “Unity Makes Strength” as my own. In others words, together we achieve better results. I believe in working together to achieve goals. It is true for an organization and a country, especially when we have a common interest.

Q3 : Over your career, what achievement are you the proudest of?

One of the duties of a diplomat is to look for opportunities for his country. Recently, I signed a contract with the Hazama Ando Corporation to build some infrastructure in Haiti that had been financed by the Japan International Cooperation Agency. Other achievements in life are contributing to the financing of the education of many young people in my country.

Q4 : What are your goals during your time in Japan, your current position or in life?

On a bilateral plan, my goals in Japan are to work on maintaining and strengthening the good relations between Haiti and Japan, where pleasant relations already exist between both countries. Other goals are to be useful to the Haitian community living in Japan by offering them quality services.

Q5 : What wisdom, advice or tips can you give to people living and working in Japan?

My advice would be to invite the Japanese businesspeople to invest in Haiti. Haiti has just promulgated a set of laws to improve the climate of business, to facilitate trade and to comply with international standards. 
Haiti offers incentives on investment to attract investors in different sectors, including the possibility of total income tax exemption for a period of 15 consecutive years, the possibility of obtaining a customs and tax exemption on imports of goods of equipment and materials necessary for the establishment and operation of the undertaking, as well as the possibility of exemption from payroll taxes.
Finally, the government reiterates its willingness to work relentlessly to attract foreign direct investment in Haiti and invites Japanese businesspeople to carry out a prospecting visit to Haiti. The Investment Facilitation Centre is there to welcome potential investors and facilitate their approaches.

Last updated: Oct 2, 2018