Dan Orlowitz

Dan Orlowitz is a sports writer for the Japan Times, focusing primarily on the J. League, Samurai Blue, and everything there is to print about Japanese soccer. A Philadelphia native and graduate of Simon's Rock College, he moved to Japan at the end of 2006 and fell in love with the beautiful game from behind the FC Tokyo goal. His words, photos, voice, and occasionally visage have appeared online, in print, and over the airwaves for numerous outlets in several languages since 2011.

For Dan Orlowitz's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:

Two first-half goals propel Frontale past Jubilo

Soccer / J. League Sep 14, 2019

Two first-half goals propel Frontale past Jubilo

Two teams winless in their last six games stepped onto the Todoroki Stadium pitch needing a win for very different reasons. Only one walked away happy on Saturday night. Yasuto Wakizaka and Kazuya Yamamura outfoxed Jubilo Iwata goalkeeper Krzysztof Kaminski in the first half as Kawasaki ...

Moriyasu relies heavily on overseas players

Soccer | From the Spot Sep 4, 2019

Moriyasu relies heavily on overseas players

The Samurai Blue are coming from increasingly far away. Head coach Hajime Moriyasu's squad for Japan's Thursday friendly against Paraguay and next Tuesday's Asian joint qualifier at Myanmar in Yangon features 19 Europe-based players — the largest overseas contingent ever summoned for the side. The number ...

Tokyo 2020 Paralympics schedule and ticket prices revealed

Paralympics Aug 13, 2019

Tokyo 2020 Paralympics schedule and ticket prices revealed

With just over a year until the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games open on Aug. 25, 2020, officials on Tuesday announced detailed schedules and ticket prices they hope will result in a significant turnout for the entirety of the 13-day event. Organizers at Tokyo 2020 headquarters ...

Soccer commentator turned dream into reality

Soccer | From the Spot Aug 7, 2019

Soccer commentator turned dream into reality

Foreigners living in Japan have few opportunities to introduce their favorite sports teams. For English teachers, it's usually in front of a class of attentive elementary or junior high school students. For others, it's an easy way to start a conversation at their local ...