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100 YEARS AGO

Saturday, Sept. 3, 1921

Forbidden ‘Banzai’ is roared by millions as crown prince arrives

“KOTAISHI DENKA BANZAI!” (Welcome home, Your Imperial Highness!)

Before one’s eyes dance a myriad of blood-red spots, on fields of purest white. In one’s ears are drumming and resounding the echoes of mighty ordinance; the blare of joyous band music; the scream of whistles; the crash of drums and cymbals; the clang of bells; and the “dull roar of reverence” from the heart of Japan.

The Heir Apparent to the Imperial throne of Japan, is home again!

Impressive as was the departure of the popular Crown Prince six months ago, on his precedent-destroying journey to Europe, it was not to be compared with his return to Tokyo today. During the half-year interval which has elapsed since the battleship Katori bore the Imperial Heir away to the Occident — the first departure of a member of the ruling family of the Empire to leave the shores of the homeland — the nation has apparently come to a keener realization of the benignity of the Imperial dynasty.

The character of the reception accorded to the Crown Prince, on the occasion of his return to Tokyo, partook of similar impressive, auspicious and thrilling events in the Occident — yet, in the very majesty of its spontaneity with which the roars of “banzai” — strictly forbidden by the police — swelled and reverberated over, under, around and through the atmosphere surrounding the potential ruler of the Empire, it was distinctly different.

Forbidden, at the last moment, to break down the high walls of custom in the matter of voicing their enthusiasms, the eager multitude — perhaps the greatest ever gathered along a given route in the history of Japan — were no more able to restrain themselves than the waves of the sea.

1921 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1921 | THE JAPAN TIMES

75 YEARS AGO

Tuesday, Sept. 3, 1946

Gen. MacArthur issues grave warning in 1st surrender anniversary message

General Douglas MacArthur, at 10 a.m. on Monday, just one year after the signing of the surrender terms by Japanese representatives aboard the U.S. Battleship Missouri in Tokyo Bay, issued the following statement:

“A year has now passed since the surrender terms were signed on the battleship Missouri. Much has been accomplished since then — much still remains to be done. But over all things and all men in this sphere of the universe hangs the dread uncertainty arising from impinging ideologies which now stir mankind. For our homeland there is no question, and for the homelands of others, free as are we to shape their own political order, there is no question. But which concept will prevail over those lands now being redesigned in the aftermath of war? This is the great issue which confronts our task in the problem of Japan — a problem which profoundly affects the destiny of all men and the future course of all civilization.”

1946 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1946 | THE JAPAN TIMES

50 YEARS AGO

Tuesday, Sept. 28, 1971

Emperor, Nixon meet in Alaska

Japan’s 70-year-old Emperor stopped briefly Sunday, Alaska time, for a brief meeting with President Richard Nixon and then flew to Denmark to start a seven-nation European tour.

The plane carrying the first ruling monarch of Japan to travel abroad left Elmendorf Air Force Base at 8:51a.m. after two hours and four minutes on American soil.

Their Majesties will be official guests of Britain, Belgium and West Germany, and official visitors to the Netherlands and Denmark. Rest stops are scheduled in Switzerland and France.

President Nixon welcomed the Emperor in a gesture he hopes will symbolize an era of friendly competition between the two enemies of World War II.

The Emperor and Empress received a 21-gun salute and other military honors as they stepped off a Japan Airlines DC8 jetliner into the glare of television klieg lights that illuminated the Alaska night.

1971 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1971 | THE JAPAN TIMES

25 YEARS AGO

Tuesday, Sept. 10, 1996

Women battle ‘bitch’ patent

A women’s group urged the Patent Office on Monday to reject a trademark application for the “bitch” brand name, saying use of the word as a trademark is offensive to women and violates public decency.

Representatives from Women Attentive to Consumer Habits, based in Beppu, Oita Prefecture, made their case during a visit to the office in Tokyo.

The application was filed in April 1994 by Crown F.G. Co., an accessories firm based in Tokyo.

The company said that it has no intention of insulting women by selling products under the bitch brand name and that bitch can also mean “girlfriend.”

WATCH members said they found a T-shirt in Beppu last May with a design of a man pointing a gun at a woman under the logo.

The company changed the design after receiving a protest from the group that it may induce gun-related crimes, but it has kept using the brand name, the members said.

1996 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1996 | THE JAPAN TIMES

Compiled by Shaun McKenna. In this feature, we delve into The Japan Times’ 125-year archive to present a selection of stories from the past. The Japan Times’ archive is now available in digital format. For more details, see jtimes.jp/de.

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