• SHARE

When the sun disappears on the trail to Everest Base Camp in December, it becomes very, very cold. It’s the kind of cold that gnaws at the bones, sapping strength and will.

Residual heat dissipates within seconds of the sun setting — or it dipping behind a cloud — and the temperature plummets. Hikers beeline to the dining rooms of their lodgings and huddle around the 4:30 p.m. fire, fueled by yak dung and the odd scrap of wood. Once dinner is served, the fire dwindles too quickly to nothing, and heavy down jackets and four-season sleeping bags become the means to survive.

In a time of both misinformation and too much information, quality journalism is more crucial than ever.
By subscribing, you can help us get the story right.

SUBSCRIBE NOW

PHOTO GALLERY (CLICK TO ENLARGE)