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Inka Essenhigh’s earlier body of work fused a personal take on Surrealism with motifs that seem borrowed from animation. Works such as “Mob + Minotaur” (2002), with such strong anime and manga characteristics, had some critics refer to it as a kind of pop-Surrealism or Japanimation.

Her recent body of work, however, is of a very different type. “The Natural and the Man-Made” could be defined as spiritual — it’s not essentialist and is without doctrines. Gone are the bodybuilders and morphing monsters of her earlier visual vocabulary, and out come the spirits of the visionary and the romantic — a nod to the 18th-century English painter and poet, William Blake.

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