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It’s been hard keeping one’s children safe, happy and healthy during a global pandemic, but families are doing the best they can. If your little ones are brimming with energy after being cooped inside during the state of emergency, they can always dance until they drop at Tokyo’s Studio Tron. Its classes focus more on having fun than being perfectly choreographed, so everyone is welcomed, writes contributor Danielle Demetriou.

It doesn’t seem all kids are staying physically active, however. Jiji reports that boys and girls in Japan in 2019 had lower athletic ability than their counterparts in 1964, when the previous Tokyo Olympics were held, an annual government survey showed.

And that is not the only health scare making headlines. Jiji also reports that around 80% of children who tested positive for COVID-19 caught it from family members, the Japan Pediatric Society has found. So wash your hands all you want — the disease is coming from inside the house.

The names Aoi and Himari were shown to be the most popular for babies born in Japan in 2020, according to one survey. | GETTY IMAGES
The names Aoi and Himari were shown to be the most popular for babies born in Japan in 2020, according to one survey. | GETTY IMAGES

That’s clearly not scaring off people from starting families and picking out cute names, as evidenced by Meiji Yasuda Life Insurance Co.’s list of the most popular baby names of 2020. The top picks for boys were Aoi, So and Ao, all of which are written as a single kanji character meaning “blue,” while the top names for girls were Himari, Hinata and Hina.

But you may notice a different side to your child after you #stayhome with them day after day. Contributor William Lang writes how his son seems to completely change personalities based on whether or not he is speaking English or Japanese. “There should be a government manual for this,” Lang writes.

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