Tag - essential-reading-for-japanophiles

 
 

ESSENTIAL READING FOR JAPANOPHILES

Japan Times
CULTURE / Books / ESSENTIAL READING FOR JAPANOPHILES
Jan 18, 2014
The Setting Sun
Career nihilist Osamu Dazai had already attempted suicide four times when he published his most famous novel in 1947. "The Setting Sun" quickly became a byword for the decline of Japan's aristocracy in the wake of World War II, but its portrait of a country adrift from its spiritual moorings would resonate with a far wider audience.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books / ESSENTIAL READING FOR JAPANOPHILES
Jan 11, 2014
Kitchen
When "Kitchen," the debut novel by Banana Yoshimoto, was first released in Japan in 1988, it caused such a stir that the media frenzy around her was dubbed "Bananamania."
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books / ESSENTIAL READING FOR JAPANOPHILES
Jan 4, 2014
Botchan
Written in 1906, Natsume Soseki's "Botchan" is based on the author's experience as a teacher in a "barbaric" country town at a time when modern, Western modes of thinking were slowly spreading across Japan from the rapidly modernizing metropolis of Tokyo. The clash between traditional Japanese values and morals and European intellectualism is one of the novel's central themes and the source of much of its humor.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books / ESSENTIAL READING FOR JAPANOPHILES
Dec 28, 2013
Snakes and Earrings
Take a walk through Tokyo's Shibuya or Shinjuku shopping districts and you'll soon notice the streets are filled with a certain kind of girl — stylishly dressed, sassy, with heavy makeup and dyed brown or blond hair. These are gyaru, and to get a peek inside their world, "Snakes and Earrings" is a good place to start — though it may not be as pretty as you'd expect.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books / ESSENTIAL READING FOR JAPANOPHILES
Dec 21, 2013
Coin Locker Babies
Ryu Murakami is known for the sex-drugs-and-violence style of his fiction and "Coin Locker Babies" has it all.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books / ESSENTIAL READING FOR JAPANOPHILES
Dec 14, 2013
Naomi
The best hint of what "Naomi" by Junichiro Tanizaki is about is its Japanese title "Chijin no Ai," ("A Fool's Love"). Written between 1924 and 1925, Tanizaki's classic tale of Japan's roaring '20s is a warning to any man who falls for a much younger woman and is fool enough to think he can control her. It's "Lolita" meets "Pygmalion," though Naomi is no "fair lady," despite the efforts of the book's narrator, Joji (professor Higgins to Naomi's Eliza).

Longform

Historically, kabuki was considered the entertainment of the merchant and peasant classes, a far cry from how it is regarded today.
For Japan's oldest kabuki theater, the show must go on