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 Roger Pulvers

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Roger Pulvers
Roger Pulvers is an author, playwright, theater director and translator who divides his time between Tokyo and Sydney. He has published more than 40 books. His latest book in English is "The Dream of Lafcadio Hearn."
For Roger Pulvers's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books
Nov 9, 2013
The Narrow Road to the Deep North
The time line of Richard Flanagan's new novel, "The Narrow Road to the Deep North," slips back and forth from prewar Tasmania, Melbourne and Adelaide to postwar Sydney, among other locations. Yet there is only one stark, unrelenting and everlasting present — "the Line," the 415-km-long Burma-Thailand railway that was built between June 1942 and October 1943 by more than 300,000 prisoners of war under the command of the Japanese. One in three prisoners' lives was lost on that arch-brutal forced march. Of those who perished, 90 percent were Asian, primarily Burmese and Malayans, but also Chinese, Tamils, Thais and Javanese. Nearly 3,000 Australians were among those killed. Richard Flanagan's father was one of the lucky POWs who survived.
Japan Times
LIFE
Aug 24, 2013
Long-gone writer tells it how it is
When Kenji Miyazawa was writing his stories and poems nearly a century ago, Japan was a country with a two-pronged mission: To become the first non-white, non-Christian nation to create a modern prosperous state — and to be the leader of an Asian revival.
LIFE
Aug 24, 2013
Politicians
They're just a bunch of
LIFE
Aug 24, 2013
Strong in the Rain
Strong in the rain
LIFE
May 26, 2013
Whatever some say, there's no Japanese-language 'code' to be deciphered
Ever since Japan opened to the outside world in the middle of the 19th century after some 250 years of isolation imposed and enforced by its ruling shoguns, the Japanese language has been widely regarded as a kind of code.
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Mar 31, 2013
Last post: Japan's outdated model is dead; long live the emerging vision
As of today, Roger Pulvers takes leave of Counterpoint, for which he has written weekly since its inception on April 3, 2005. In his final three columns, he set out to consider in turn Japan in the past, present and future. This is the concluding part of that trilogy.
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Mar 24, 2013
In a nation shaken to its core, Japan's leaders offer more of the same
Roger Pulvers leaves Counterpoint at the end of this month after writing the column weekly since April 3, 2005. In his last three Counterpoints he has set out to consider in turn Japan in the past, present and future. This is his penultimate contribution.
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Mar 17, 2013
Japan's rollercoaster modern history has kept coming off the rails
At the end of this month, Roger Pulvers will be leaving Counterpoint. In his last three columns since his inaugural weekly Counterpoint on April 3, 2005, he will consider in turn Japan in the past, present and future.
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Mar 10, 2013
Tohoku has been truly rent asunder for untold generations yet to be born
There are now three Tohokus ... and there have been since the afternoon of March 11, 2011.
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Mar 3, 2013
The days may be numbered for English as a universal second language
How long will English last as a major world language? The answer must be: a very long time.
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Feb 24, 2013
Osaka: Japan's latterday second city forever breaks the national mold
They're funny, finicky and feisty, not to mention being full of wicked mischief, with their own way of talking, too. Outside of Japan, think of Liverpool, not London; or Munich, not Berlin; or Mumbai, not Delhi. I'm talking about the people of Osaka.
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Feb 17, 2013
Whoever could pass a test to list 'values at the heart of being Japanese'?
Calling all those readers who in their heart of hearts have always wanted to be British! Well, you've got your chance now, you presumptuous Penny-Laners and putative Pythons.
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Feb 10, 2013
Abe's 'unpredictable past' runs counter to his people's remorse over wars
u201cThey were remarks made to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II. But since then we have welcomed in the 21st century."
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Feb 3, 2013
Citizens' lack of resolve leaves nuclear door wide open for next disaster
Second of two parts
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Jan 26, 2013
How Kan-do attitude averted the meltdown of Japan
Covering the catastrophic series of events that began with the magnitude 9 earthquake and the tsunami it triggered on March 11, 2011, "Tu014dden Fukushima Genpatsu Jiko Su014dri Toshite Kangaeta Koto" is one of the most revealing and insightful books published in Japan in the past decade.
Japan Times
JAPAN / Media
Jan 19, 2013
Oshima was in a realm of his own
Film director Nagisa Oshima passed away Tuesday. He was 80.
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Jan 19, 2013
Citizens' woeful social consciousness ensures a bleak outlook for Japan
What is behind the miserable social status of women in Japan?
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Jan 13, 2013
Beate Sirota Gordon: An American to whom Japan remains indebted
Beate Sirota Gordon passed away on Dec. 30. She was 89.
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Jan 6, 2013
Abe returns to 'retrieve' Japan from its history — or will he just repeat it?
Way back in the heady 1960s, Japan was one big Cathedral of Optimism, and I found myself among a people who believed their country was finally on that road laid out before them in the post-feudal Meiji Era (1868-1912) to "catch up with and overtake" the West. And indeed, by the end of the decade Japan's annual gross domestic product was second only to that of the United States, and many believed — just as they do with China now — that it would someday be No. 1.
COMMENTARY / COUNTERPOINT
Dec 30, 2012
Is juggernaut Japan being driven to destruction (and no one's to blame)?
Ryotaro Shiba, the great author of historical novels, was a student of Mongolian at Osaka University of Foreign Languages when, at the end of 1943, he was drafted into the army. Then aged 20, he received a "provisional graduation qualification" (the actual certificate was issued the following year) and found himself in Manchuria, which was at that time the Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo.

Longform

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