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Tim Adams
For Tim Adams's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books
Aug 3, 2013
Story of the modern Bonnie and Clyde
Like all the best fabled morality tales this one begins in a walk-in wardrobe. The wardrobe belongs to Paris Hilton and the interlopers into that strange fantasy land are a pair of bored high school dropouts who have wandered here in search of adventure (and free designer stuff).
Japan Times
WORLD / Science & Health
Jul 19, 2013
The weird and wonderful world of the naked mole rat
Doctor Chris Faulkes, who has been working with them almost every day for the last 25 years, has long since learned to love naked mole rats, but, as he concedes, since they are "pretty much blind and live underground in the dark, they are not necessarily naturally selecting on good looks."
Japan Times
ENVIRONMENT
Jul 5, 2013
'Wind farms are not the answer to our problems'
Why do you think scientists and politicians have been slow and reluctant to confront population growth? It might be useful to first distinguish between growth and behavior. The problem is less the current number of us in itself (yet) but more the way the majority of the 7 billion of us live and consume. This is principally the cause of almost every global problem we face. Critically, every one of these problems is set to accelerate as we continue to grow. "Confronting," as you put it, the way we live and consume is not something that politicians want to do.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books
Jun 16, 2013
Writers' elegant letters to each other suffer from lack of venom and indiscretion
The demise of letter writing is the cause of widespread lament.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Books
Jun 16, 2013
Jimbo's memoir mirrors his alpha-male tennis career
Like most great tennis players of the million-dollar era, the career of Jimmy Connors began prenatally. As with Andy Murray, his Grand Slam gene was passed down the maternal line.
Japan Times
JAPAN / Science & Health
May 18, 2013
Neocriminology: identifying a murderer's brain
In 1987, Adrian Raine, who describes himself as a neurocriminologist, moved from Britain to America. His emigration was prompted by two things. The first was a sense of banging his head against a wall. Raine, who grew up in England, and is now a professor at the University of Philadelphia, was a researcher of the biological basis for criminal behavior, which, with its echoes of Nazi eugenics, was perhaps the most taboo of all academic disciplines.
Japan Times
CULTURE / Music
Mar 9, 2013
Thom Yorke: 'If I can't enjoy this now, when do I start?'
You don't necessarily associate Thom Yorke with fun. Radiohead's frontman and principal songwriter has tended to have different kinds of adjectives attached to him in his two decades in the music pages: 'intense,' 'tortured' and 'angst-ridden,' or 'impassioned,' 'essential' and 'important.'
Japan Times
BUSINESS / Tech
Jan 25, 2013
I still haven't found what I'm looking for ...
Thinking about Google over the last week, I have fallen into the typically procrastinatory habit of every so often typing the words "what is" or "what" or "wha" into the Google search box at the top right of my computer screen. Those prompts are all the omnipotent engine needs to inform me of the current instant top 10 of the virtual world's most urgent desires. At the time of typing, this list reads, in descending order:
Japan Times
ENVIRONMENT
Jan 19, 2013
Why spider's silk is becoming man's best friend
Up on the roof of professor Fritz Vollrath's lab in the zoology department at Oxford University, there is a makeshift greenhouse in which he nurtures his favorite golden orb web spiders. Walking into the greenhouse is a little like finding yourself inside one of those Damien Hirst vitrines that dramatize fast-forward life and death.

Longform

Yayoi Kusama’s “Pumpkin,” once the victim of high waves that dragged it into the sea, sits at the end of a pier on the south side of Naoshima.
Why is the most exciting art in Japan so hard to get to?