National

Dr. NakaMats unveils bladed 'guard wig' invention for Donald Trump

Kyodo

Dr. NakaMats, the alias of inventor Yoshiro Nakamatsu, unveiled Friday yet another quirky contraption: a wig with a built-in sword for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

“The Guard Wig is one invention out of 3,500 inventions and contains a Japanese sword, shuriken, built inside,” the 88-year-old self-professed scientist said in an interview after unveiling his latest invention at the Mmuseumm, a modern natural history museum in Manhattan. “This wig attacks the enemy and then comes back. So he can use it many times to attack,” he said.

When asked if he is a Trump supporter, Nakamatsu responded, “No, I am a professor of Wharton School. So Trump is my student. Therefore I gift my invention to him.”

The Mamori-gami guard wig, a Japanese homonym for guardian hair and guardian angel, was not visible as it was still in a white cardboard box, sealed in plastic.

Nakamatsu won the Ig Nobel Prize in 2005 in the nutrition science category for taking photos of every meal he has eaten for 35 years and analyzing the effects of food on the health of the body, brain activity and longevity.

Upon his arrival at the museum, attendees waved small red flags with his face plastered in the middle. Not only did he present the wig, but also led attendees in a song about overcoming cancer.

Diagnosed in 2014 with terminal ductal prostate cancer, Nakamatsu has vowed to find a cure “to save the people of the world.”

The quirky, hip Mmuseumm is known for being the smallest in the city, fitting no more than four people comfortably. About 300 people congregated in the alley to see Nakamatsu and his creations on display, including the floppy disk, which he claims to have invented and licensed to International Business Machines Corp., ISIS currency, and “nothing.”

“It is important for him to see it because there is nothing quite like seeing the real thing,” said Alex Kalman, director of Mmuseumm.

Nakamatsu enthusiasts lined up with floppy disks and pieces of paper for autographs. But for some, Nakamatsu is not just an inventor but a source of “energy.”

Sumi Kubota, a retired 68-year-old said, “Last year I heard him talk and I somehow fell in love with him. He is an inspiration.”