Jan 7, 2017

Human brain's face recognition develops into adulthood: studies

The part of the human brain involved in face recognition keeps developing into adulthood, a pair of new studies found, surprising scientists who thought brain tissue growth stopped in early childhood. Researchers led by Kalanit Grill-Spector, a psychology professor at Stanford University, examined the ...

Sex exists to avoid disease, study demonstrates

Dec 21, 2016

Sex exists to avoid disease, study demonstrates

From an evolutionary perspective, sexual reproduction could be seen as a nonstarter. Compared to cloning, which also exists in nature, it is a major waste of time and energy. Think of the ungainly, preening peacock — an easy snack for tigers and wild dogs ...

Nov 25, 2016

Gut microbes may play role in yo-yo dieting, obesity

Scientists studying yo-yo dieting in mice say the tendency for people to regain excess weight rapidly after successfully slimming may well be due to their microbiome — the trillions of microorganisms in the gut. The researchers found that changes in the gut microbiome that ...

In Belgian lab, the quest for the perfect beer yeast

Nov 18, 2016

In Belgian lab, the quest for the perfect beer yeast

Belgium famously produces hundreds of different beers, but that is nothing compared to the varieties of yeast used to make them — around 30,000 are kept on ice at just one laboratory by scientists seeking the perfect ingredient for the perfect brew. A team ...

'Frankenstein' predicted a concept key to modern biology

Oct 30, 2016

'Frankenstein' predicted a concept key to modern biology

Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” foreshadowed a key concept in evolutionary biology that was formally defined by scientists a full century after the man-made monster shambled across the pages of the 19th-century novel, an academic study published on Friday found. The study, which is titled “Frankenstein ...

Oct 19, 2016

Risk of miscarriages linked to mutations in gene

Scientists said Wednesday they had linked mutations in a specific gene with an increased risk of recurrent miscarriages, offering hopes of better diagnosis and treatment for affected women. The gene, dubbed FOXD1, was first pinpointed in lab mice, a team of international researchers wrote ...