Jackson Diehl

For Jackson Diehl's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:

Dec 31, 2013

2013, a year of angry elites

The crowds who called for revolution in Cairo, Istanbul, Bangkok and Kiev in 2013 were not the impoverished losers of globalization. They were mostly the economic winners: middle-class, educated, English-speaking. So why were they rebelling?

Dec 3, 2013

Eurasian nations pressured by Putin's Russia

Ten years after Mikheil Saakashvili, then a 35-year-old U.S.-trained lawyer, led a march on the parliament of Georgia that overturned a corrupt regime and inaugurated a liberal democratic surge in Eurasia, the wave has receded.

Nov 12, 2013

John Kerry's Mideast dream world

Imagine a world in which the Mideast is not descending into chaos but is on the brink of a monumental series of breakthroughs. This is the magical world of the U.S. secretary of state.

Sep 6, 2012

Where Obama and Romney differ on foreign policy

This presidential election will likely determine whether the United States and Russia undertake a major new reduction of nuclear weapons; whether U.S. arms are supplied to Syrian rebels; whether more U.S. troops are withdrawn from Afghanistan next year; and whether Washington renews pressure on ...

Aug 9, 2012

Candidates want you to forget the Afghan war

Here’s some news that both Barack Obama and Mitt Romney would like you to ignore: Tens of thousands of American soldiers are at war this summer in Afghanistan. Though you’d never know it from listening to the candidates, U.S. Marine and Army units have ...

Jun 27, 2012

Obama shares the blame for Arab Spring mess

A year ago Barack Obama described the epic wave of revolution that had begun in Tunisia and Egypt as “a historic opportunity” for the United States “to pursue the world as it should be.” He said America must promote “change that advances self-determination and ...

May 31, 2012

Anxiety growing in China about the road ahead

The worrying news from China is that the country appears headed toward an economic and political crash sometime in the next five years, if current trends continue. The somewhat better news is that a large part of the elite grasps that danger, and is ...