/

Man held on suspicion of owning guns made with 3-D printer

Kyodo

A 27-year-old man who allegedly made handguns with a 3-D printer was arrested Thursday on suspicion of illegal weapons possession, the first time Japan’s firearms control law has been applied to the possession of guns made by this method.

The suspect, Yoshitomo Imura, an employee of Shonan Institute of Technology in Fujisawa, Kanagawa Prefecture, had the plastic guns at his home in Kawasaki in mid-April, the police said. No bullets have been found.

The police launched an investigation earlier this year after Imura posted video footage online of the guns, which he claimed to have produced himself, along with blueprints for them, according to investigative sources.

One of Imura’s postings carried the comment, “The right to bear firearms is a basic human right.”

Police searched Imura’s home last month and seized five guns, two of which can fire real bullets, the sources said.

Imura, who purchased a 3-D printer for around ¥60,000 on the Internet, was quoted as telling investigators during the search, “I produced the guns, but I didn’t think it was illegal.”

“I can’t complain about the arrest if the police regard them as real guns,” he reportedly said.

They believe Imura downloaded blueprints for the guns from overseas websites.

Expected to cut manufacturing costs in industry, the printers also are capable of producing firearms. A U.S. gun maker announced last year it had succeeded in firing real bullets using a gun produced by a 3-D printer.

Security authorities around the world are on alert because designs are easily accessible on the Internet for such guns, which cannot be spotted by metal detectors if they are made of resin.

  • William Swartzendruber

    3D printing is going to force us to look at contraband differently. I doubt firearms are the only controlled items that can be produced with them.

  • http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg EatMoreChikin

    the firing pin must still be metal.

    • Kit Fritters

      No you are wrong. The firing pin can be stone, glass, plastic, or even wood. All that matters is stiffness and the ability to dent a primer cap. Durability is not an isssue, because most 3-D printed guns are one-shot only.

  • JimmyJM

    Making the bullet is easy. They can be made of wood, plastic, even ice. The cartridge however must be metal to contain the explosion that projects the bullet. But the bottom line is, if you want one – wherever you are, you can get one. It is only governments who fear their populations that attempt to ban guns or other weapons. That doesn’t mean these weapons can’t be accounted for as in what kind of weapon, who owns it, and where is it. Any weapon not in a data base or found in the possession of someone other than the registered owner, could be confiscated. None of this would have prevented Sandy Hook.

  • Raymon555

    I feel really bad for people in this economy, I like everyone have been struggling. But I tell you what I’ve done I’ve taken life into my own hands being responsible for myself. I knew trading was the answer for me and I’ve purchased different courses at different places and the best course I’ve found by far is at the website Traders Superstore, just Google them and find them and do like I did they get started trading for yourself and take life into your own hands.

  • Joe Kremer

    If I had the money, I could buy a WMD from North Korea.