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Five recent articles focusing on Japan’s diverse foreign communities:

  • Almost four decades on from its origins in the arrival of women to work as hostesses at so-called Philippine pubs, the Filipino community has put down deep roots in Japan — but one still largely made up of women, Kyodo reports. Filipinos have branched out into other jobs, with many working as caregivers and teachers, or in hotels, shops and factories.
  • There are around 40,000 Indians living in Japan, but their stories are little known outside their own community. No longer. For her Ph.D. and new book “Indian Migrants in Tokyo,” Megha Wadhwa interviewed over 100 Indian residents, providing numerous biographical portraits of how these individuals balance their love of Japan with their strong ties to India as they construct a home away from home in Tokyo, writes Patrick Parr.
Megha Wadhwa’s book, 'Indian Migrants in Tokyo,' is based on personal experience and extensive research drawn from over 100 interviews with Indian residents of Japan.
Megha Wadhwa’s book, ‘Indian Migrants in Tokyo,’ is based on personal experience and extensive research drawn from over 100 interviews with Indian residents of Japan.
  • Director Akio Fujimoto’s “Along the Sea” follows three young women from Vietnam who arrive in Japan to work as technical interns. The trio flee harsh work conditions and are forced to confront new challenges as undocumented workers in a small coastal town. Fujimoto hopes the film will shine a light on the exploitative reality many such foreign workers face in Japan.
  • When a Japanese company boss and his Vietnamese employee learned that many Vietnamese here were facing financial difficulties due to the pandemic, they took action. The president of Unidos Co. sent food to Vietnamese in need and shouldered the rent for a shelter for those who lost their homes in Japan. Kyodo tells their story.
  • An island in Nagasaki Prefecture suffering from depopulation has offered Vietnamese students a discount to study Japanese there. Before the first foreign arrivals, there were local concerns about how the Vietnamese would settle into the peaceful rhythm of island life, but they needn’t have worried. “The whole island is getting energy from them,” says one of the islanders.

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