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Lydia Ko hopes to make it third time lucky in the Women’s British Open at Carnoustie this week after the New Zealander ended her poor run of form.

Following a disappointing spell, South Korea-born Ko is back on track and she goes into Thursday’s final major of the season on a hot streak.

The 24-year-old finished third at the Olympic Games in Tokyo and then second at the Women’s Scottish Open.

Now she wants to get her hands on the British Open trophy.

“It’s been a tough few weeks and it would be nice to end on a real high before taking a break,” she said.

Ko became the youngest world No. 1 aged 17 in 2015, but slipped down the rankings before ending a three-year victory drought in Hawaii earlier this season.

“I don’t really set goals any more,” said the two-time major winner. “I just try and do my best every week.

“I used to be the youngest out here but now there are players three or four years younger.

“Golf is great because you can play for a long time, but I have always said I intend to retire at 30. There are lots of other things I want to do.

“But it would be great to do well this week. The course is very tough, but I am hitting it longer than a few years ago so that helps.”

Park Inbee, a seven-time major champion, has happy memories of Scotland after winning the Women’s British Open at Turnberry in 2015.

“It’s always good to be back. I played here in 2011 and I think I did quite well,” she said.

“The course does seem longer and I think there are a few changes.”

Park finished fourth last year at Royal Troon and the former world No. 1 still rides high in third place in the world rankings.

The South Korean won in rough conditions at Turnberry and is hoping the unsettled weather doesn’t spoil her latest title bid.

“I recall that it wasn’t very windy at all when we were here 10 years ago. But if it blows it is going to be very tough,” she said.

Yuka Saso won the Women’s U.S. Open this season, earning a first trip to Scotland and a debut in the Women’s British Open.

The 20-year-old Filipino said: “It is a very difficult course. The wind, the bunkers, the burns. So different.

“It is summer in Scotland but I am wearing a warm jacket. It is certainly different.”

A lot has changed since Saso became the first from her country to win the Women’s U.S. Open, but she is enjoying the experience.

“It has been good fun and all so new. This is another week to enjoy,” she said.

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